Seminar: The "Enemy Language" Press Under Martial Law: Military Control of Japanese Newspapers in Wartime Hawai‘i

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Brown Bag Seminar by Visiting Scholar, Takeya Mizuno

When: Mar 27 2017 - 12:00pm until Mar 27 2017 - 1:00pm
Where: John A. Burns Hall, 3012 (Third Floor)
What:
This research examines the life-changing impact of Pearl Harbor on the Japanese “enemy language” newspapers in Hawai‘i during World War II. Institution of martial law shattered the First Amendment press freedom as well as ethnic self-esteem of Japanese Americans in the Territory. The sweeping arrests of core staffers started from December 7, 1941. The language press was soon licensed and suspended categorically by military orders. Although a “permit” of resumption was issued later, remaining staffers had to bear not only stringent censorship, but intrusive, embarrassing propaganda.
 
Takeya Mizuno’s expertise is in American journalism history, especially that of Japanese Americans. He received his PhD from the School of Journalism, University of Missouri – Columbia in 2000. He has been teaching at the Department of Media and Communications Studies, School of Sociology, Toyo University, Tokyo, Japan since 2006. He is currently a visiting scholar at the East-West Center. His most recent publications include Press Control in the “Land of the Free”: Japanese American Journalism during World War II (Tokyo: Yoshikawa Kobun Kan, 2014); “Press Freedom in the Enemy’s Language: Government Control of Japanese-Language Newspapers in Japanese American Camps during World War II,” Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly Vol.93, No.1 (Spring 2016).
Primary Contact Info:
Name: Anna Tanaka
Phone: 808.944.7607