ASDP Online Panel: Do Asian Studies Matter for Minority-Serving Institutions? ASDP Online Panel: Do Asian Studies Matter for Minority-Serving Institutions?
Virtual Virtual

ASDP ONLINE PANEL

Do Asian Studies Matter for Minority-Serving Institutions?


October 10, 2022 - COMPLETED

Hosted Online: 10:00am-11:30am Hawaii Standard Time

This free online panel discussion will explore why Asian studies matters for students at colleges and universities serving Black, Latinx, Asian-American, Native-American, and Pacific Islander communities. Addressing topics ranging from personal motivations to nurturing institutional commitments to the study of Asian cultures and societies, panelists will share perspectives on the challenges and rewards of enhancing qualities of inclusion in the American undergraduate experience by engaging cultural differences as opportunities for mutual contribution.

Click the flyer below to learn more.

Do Asian Studies Matter for Minority-Serving Institutions? Click here for the online panel flyer

PANELISTS

Dr. Petrice Flowers is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Her research focuses on international norms and domestic politics in Japan. She published her first book, Refugees, Women and Weapons: International Norm Adoption and Compliance in Japan in 2009 (Stanford University Press). Dr. Flowers has two monographs under contract: Expanding Protection: Human Rights Networking in Japan and Korea and Refugee Policies in East Asia. She writes widely on topics that focus on global-local connections between Japan and the world, including on issues related to gender and multiculturalism. She has received funding for research from the Fulbright US Scholars Program and the Social Science Research Council, among others.

Dr. Will Bridges is the Arthur Satz Professor of the Humanities, Associate Professor of Japanese, and Core Faculty member of the Frederick Douglass Institute for African and African-American Studies at the University of Rochester. His first monograph is Playing in the Shadows: Fictions of Race and Blackness in Postwar Japanese Literature (University of Michigan Press, 2020). He is currently working on two manuscripts: The Futurist Turn: Reimagining Intergenerational Justice at the End of Heisei and The Black Pacific: A Poetic History. He is the founding editor of the Journal of Social and Cultural Possibilities, and he is also an author of creative nonfiction. His latest publication is a co-edited volume entitled Who is the Asianist? The Politics of Representation in Asian Studies (Association for Asian Studies, 2022).

Dr. Fuji Lozada is Acting Dean of Faculty, Chief Diversity Officer, and Professor of Anthropology at Davidson College. After receiving a B.S. in Chemistry and Physics from Harvard College (1986), he served as a US Marine Corps infantry officer before returning to Harvard University to earn his M.A. (Regional Studies: East Asia) and a Ph.D. (Social Anthropology, 1999). His doctoral research resulted in his book, God Aboveground: Catholic Church, Postsocialist State, and Transnational Processes in a Chinese Village (Stanford, 2001). Prior to coming to Davidson College, he taught anthropology for three years at Butler University in Indianapolis, and before that taught at Yonsei University, in Seoul, Korea.

Dr. Tinaz Pavri is Division Chair for Social Sciences and Education, professor of Political Science, and Founding Director of the Asian Studies Program at Spelman College. Her research interests lie in security studies and conflict resolution, and in national identity and globalization in South Asia. She has published numerous articles, book chapters and a co-edited book on these and other topics, and is the author of Bombay in the Age of Disco: City, Community, Life (2015). She has served as President of the Georgia Political Science Association and in 2015 received their Donald T. Wells award for outstanding service. A recipient of Spelman’s Presidential awards for Scholarship and Service, she directs its $1.2m grant project, the Career Pathways Initiative.

MODERATOR

Dr. Anita Plummer is Assistant Professor of African Studies and Associate Director of Research and Faculty Engagement at the Center for Women, Gender, and Global Leadership at Howard University. Her research and teaching focus on African political economy, transnationalism, public diplomacy, and Sino-African relations. Her book, Kenya’s Engagement with China: Discourse, Power, and Agency is forthcoming in November 2022.

ASDP ONLINE PANEL

Do Asian Studies Matter for Minority-Serving Institutions?


October 10, 2022 - COMPLETED

Hosted Online: 10:00am-11:30am Hawaii Standard Time

This free online panel discussion will explore why Asian studies matters for students at colleges and universities serving Black, Latinx, Asian-American, Native-American, and Pacific Islander communities. Addressing topics ranging from personal motivations to nurturing institutional commitments to the study of Asian cultures and societies, panelists will share perspectives on the challenges and rewards of enhancing qualities of inclusion in the American undergraduate experience by engaging cultural differences as opportunities for mutual contribution.

Click the flyer below to learn more.

Do Asian Studies Matter for Minority-Serving Institutions? Click here for the online panel flyer

PANELISTS

Dr. Petrice Flowers is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Her research focuses on international norms and domestic politics in Japan. She published her first book, Refugees, Women and Weapons: International Norm Adoption and Compliance in Japan in 2009 (Stanford University Press). Dr. Flowers has two monographs under contract: Expanding Protection: Human Rights Networking in Japan and Korea and Refugee Policies in East Asia. She writes widely on topics that focus on global-local connections between Japan and the world, including on issues related to gender and multiculturalism. She has received funding for research from the Fulbright US Scholars Program and the Social Science Research Council, among others.

Dr. Will Bridges is the Arthur Satz Professor of the Humanities, Associate Professor of Japanese, and Core Faculty member of the Frederick Douglass Institute for African and African-American Studies at the University of Rochester. His first monograph is Playing in the Shadows: Fictions of Race and Blackness in Postwar Japanese Literature (University of Michigan Press, 2020). He is currently working on two manuscripts: The Futurist Turn: Reimagining Intergenerational Justice at the End of Heisei and The Black Pacific: A Poetic History. He is the founding editor of the Journal of Social and Cultural Possibilities, and he is also an author of creative nonfiction. His latest publication is a co-edited volume entitled Who is the Asianist? The Politics of Representation in Asian Studies (Association for Asian Studies, 2022).

Dr. Fuji Lozada is Acting Dean of Faculty, Chief Diversity Officer, and Professor of Anthropology at Davidson College. After receiving a B.S. in Chemistry and Physics from Harvard College (1986), he served as a US Marine Corps infantry officer before returning to Harvard University to earn his M.A. (Regional Studies: East Asia) and a Ph.D. (Social Anthropology, 1999). His doctoral research resulted in his book, God Aboveground: Catholic Church, Postsocialist State, and Transnational Processes in a Chinese Village (Stanford, 2001). Prior to coming to Davidson College, he taught anthropology for three years at Butler University in Indianapolis, and before that taught at Yonsei University, in Seoul, Korea.

Dr. Tinaz Pavri is Division Chair for Social Sciences and Education, professor of Political Science, and Founding Director of the Asian Studies Program at Spelman College. Her research interests lie in security studies and conflict resolution, and in national identity and globalization in South Asia. She has published numerous articles, book chapters and a co-edited book on these and other topics, and is the author of Bombay in the Age of Disco: City, Community, Life (2015). She has served as President of the Georgia Political Science Association and in 2015 received their Donald T. Wells award for outstanding service. A recipient of Spelman’s Presidential awards for Scholarship and Service, she directs its $1.2m grant project, the Career Pathways Initiative.

MODERATOR

Dr. Anita Plummer is Assistant Professor of African Studies and Associate Director of Research and Faculty Engagement at the Center for Women, Gender, and Global Leadership at Howard University. Her research and teaching focus on African political economy, transnationalism, public diplomacy, and Sino-African relations. Her book, Kenya’s Engagement with China: Discourse, Power, and Agency is forthcoming in November 2022.