Beyond Ranking and Monitoring in the TIP Report: US Cooperation with ASEAN on Anti-Human Trafficking

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When: Sep 13 2017 - 3:00pm until Sep 13 2017 - 4:30pm
Where: 1819 L St NW, Sixth Floor Conference Room, Washington DC, 20036
What:

Beyond Ranking and Monitoring in the TIP Report: US Cooperation with ASEAN on Anti-Human Trafficking

An Asia Pacific Democratic Values and Human Rights Seminar featuring:

Ruji Auethavornpipat
Asia Studies Visiting Fellow, East-West Center in Washington, DC and
PhD Candidate, Department of International Relations, Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, The Australian National University

Dr. Ellen L. Frost (Moderator)
Senior Advisor & Fellow at the East West Center and a Visiting Distinguished Research Fellow at the National Defense University's Institute of National Strategic Studies.


It is well-established that the US government is a global sheriff on the issue of human trafficking. This can be observed through the annual publication of the Trafficking inLeft to right: Ruji Auethanvornpipat and Dr. Ellen Frost. Persons (TIP) Report by the US Department of State, which ranks individual countries around the globe based on their effort in eradicating human trafficking. Yet, beyond the TIP report, little is known about what role the US plays on anti-trafficking agendas within its engagement with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). This talk will present preliminary research findings that explain the nature of US-ASEAN cooperation on the issue of trafficking, trace U.S. policy development, and demonstrate how the policy of both the US and ASEAN progressively converge. Furthermore, by situating the US government’s activities at the ASEAN level, these findings capture the way in which the US role allows ASEAN to be in the driver’s seat of its own regional anti-trafficking programs. Consequently, it reveals that the US has a different but limited authority in the regional environment that is governed by the ASEAN Way principles, based on non-intervention, consultation, and consensus-based decision-making. The issue of human trafficking thus provides one case study of how U.S.-ASEAN relations address the interplay between Washington’s global agenda setting and evaluation roles and the “ASEAN Way.”

Wednesday, September 13
3:00 P.M. – 4:30 PM
This event will be off-the-record.

East-West Center in Washington
1819 L St, NW, Washington, DC. Sixth Floor Conference Room
This event is free and open to the public.

 For more images, please visit the album for this event on the East-West Center's Flickr page. 


Ruji Auethavornpipat is a PhD Candidate in the Department of International Relations, Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, The Australian National University. His PhD thesis examines the Association of Southeast Asian Nations’ (ASEAN) policy on migrant worker rights protection. It seeks to understand the emergence of migrant worker rights norms as well as the socialization process among ASEAN members. Ruji is currently an Asia Studies Visiting Fellow at the East-West Center in Washington, DC where he is conducting a project investigating US-ASEAN cooperation on human trafficking. This project is supported by the East-West Center and partially funded by the ASEASUK Research and Impact Award from the Association of Southeast Asian Studies in the United Kingdom. He has also published an article assessing ASEAN cooperation on migrant workers rights protection in Global Change, Peace & Security.

Dr. Ellen L. Frost is a Senior Advisor & Fellow at the East West Center and a Visiting Distinguished Research Fellow at the National Defense University's Institute of National Strategic Studies. She writes and lectures frequently on Asian political-economic issues and their strategic implications. Her most recent book is Asia's New Regionalism. She previously served in various US government jobs, including Counselor to the US Trade Representative (1993–95) and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Economic and Technology Affairs (1977-81). During the 1980s she worked for two multinational corporations. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the International Institute of Strategic Studies, and the U.S. Committee of CSCAP (Council on Security Cooperation in Asia Pacific). She also serves on the board of Relief International, a non-profit international humanitarian and development organization. She received a Ph.D. from the Department of Government at Harvard University, an MA from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and a BA from Radcliffe College, Harvard University.


Primary Contact Info:
Name: Sarah Wang
Phone: 2023279755