EWC Insights: Asia-Pacific Transitions series EWC Insights: Asia-Pacific Transitions series
Coastal Community Sustainability in Japan: Aquaculture, Rice Farming, and Local Voices of Natural Disaster Recovery at Matsushima Bay Area Coastal Community Sustainability in Japan: Aquaculture, Rice Farming, and Local Voices of Natural Disaster Recovery at Matsushima Bay Area
Hybrid Hybrid

Join us to explore the meaning of "sustainability" from the Matsushima bay area, Japan. Matsushima bay is located on the central coast of Miyagi prefecture, facing the Pacific Ocean. The community benefits from abundant marine resources (oysters and seaweed), farming landscapes, and livelihoods intertwined with traditional knowledge developed over generations. It is also an area still in the long process of community recovery from the natural disaster in 2011. This presentation will spotlight local voices on initiatives to support and revitalize the aquaculture industry, raises key dimensions of community notions of sustainability, and describes some of the challenges of cultural preservation amid climate change and disaster recovery. 

Mr. Yasumoto will briefly introduce current rural revitalization projects in the Matsushima bay area. Ms. Miku will explain the current challenges on primary industries (fishery, rice farming, and forestry) in her community from climate change and aging populations, especially its impact on the aquaculture industry. She will also talk about how these initiatives are linked with community efforts at disaster recovery, and the importance of cultural preservation for the future. 

The views expressed are those of the speaker and do not necessarily reflect East-West Center policies or positions.

Ms. Miku Narisawa is originally from Miyagi, Japan, is currently a graduate student majoring in peace and environment studies at Meiji University in Tokyo. After graduating from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Miku is now involved in local development projects both with governments and communities to promote aquaculture in her hometown with In-outbound sendai-matsushima inc., where they are facing challenges of preserving culture, natural landscape, and people from climate change.She also serves as an educational facilitator at Lōkahi Foundation where she coordinates global youth programs. Experiencing the Great East Japan Earthquake at the age of 12 made her explore different aspects of peacebuilding in the natural disaster and ocean conversation.

Mr. Yasumoto Nishidate is a Senior Managing Director at In-outbound Sendai-Matsushima Inc. a destination management organization (DMO) in Miyagi prefecture, Japan. He was born and raised in Aomori, an upper northern prefecture of Japan where his family operates farming. His current work is to manage rural revitalization projects by promoting tourism in the Matsushima-bay area, Miyagi Prefecture. He cherishes his commitment to building solid relationships with community members and the public and private sectors to create a sustainable community for the next generation.

Join us to explore the meaning of "sustainability" from the Matsushima bay area, Japan. Matsushima bay is located on the central coast of Miyagi prefecture, facing the Pacific Ocean. The community benefits from abundant marine resources (oysters and seaweed), farming landscapes, and livelihoods intertwined with traditional knowledge developed over generations. It is also an area still in the long process of community recovery from the natural disaster in 2011. This presentation will spotlight local voices on initiatives to support and revitalize the aquaculture industry, raises key dimensions of community notions of sustainability, and describes some of the challenges of cultural preservation amid climate change and disaster recovery. 

Mr. Yasumoto will briefly introduce current rural revitalization projects in the Matsushima bay area. Ms. Miku will explain the current challenges on primary industries (fishery, rice farming, and forestry) in her community from climate change and aging populations, especially its impact on the aquaculture industry. She will also talk about how these initiatives are linked with community efforts at disaster recovery, and the importance of cultural preservation for the future. 

The views expressed are those of the speaker and do not necessarily reflect East-West Center policies or positions.

Ms. Miku Narisawa is originally from Miyagi, Japan, is currently a graduate student majoring in peace and environment studies at Meiji University in Tokyo. After graduating from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Miku is now involved in local development projects both with governments and communities to promote aquaculture in her hometown with In-outbound sendai-matsushima inc., where they are facing challenges of preserving culture, natural landscape, and people from climate change.She also serves as an educational facilitator at Lōkahi Foundation where she coordinates global youth programs. Experiencing the Great East Japan Earthquake at the age of 12 made her explore different aspects of peacebuilding in the natural disaster and ocean conversation.

Mr. Yasumoto Nishidate is a Senior Managing Director at In-outbound Sendai-Matsushima Inc. a destination management organization (DMO) in Miyagi prefecture, Japan. He was born and raised in Aomori, an upper northern prefecture of Japan where his family operates farming. His current work is to manage rural revitalization projects by promoting tourism in the Matsushima-bay area, Miyagi Prefecture. He cherishes his commitment to building solid relationships with community members and the public and private sectors to create a sustainable community for the next generation.