The Inclusive Campus: Focus on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders The Inclusive Campus: Focus on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders
Virtual Virtual

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The Inclusive Campus: Focus on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

Regional Center Workshop with the Asian Studies Program at Belmont University

February 3, 2023

Hosted Online: 11:00am Hawaii Time, 4:00pm Eastern Time, 3:00pm Central Time, 1:00pm Pacific Time

REGISTER HERE

This program will explore the dynamics of inclusion with a focus on Asian American and Pacific Islander studies and students. The two-hour webinar will feature a keynote talk on changing the narrative of race relations on American college and university campuses and the communities they serve, followed by a panel discussion reflecting on how best to translate diversity commitments into initiatives that address the needs of AAPI faculty and students.

Keynote Speaker

"Confronting anti-Asian hate with history: Nurturing historical empathy through storytelling"
Karen Umemoto, Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles
Asian Americans experienced a record number of race-motivated hate crimes and incidents during the pandemic. Research has identified the causes of racial violence and tensions historically. While there is no silver bullet to end anti-Asian animus, one of the most promising solutions is education that nurtures historical empathy. Storytelling that brings a human face to Asian Americans and conveys the diversity and humanity among us can change the narrative of race relations in the future. This talk will address renewed efforts to teach Asian American and Ethnic Studies in schools and colleges across the nation, and will include a demonstration of the AAPI Multimedia Textbook prototype as a means of classroom storytelling towards greater human empathy.

Karen Umemoto is a Professor in the Departments of Urban Planning and Asian American Studies and the Helen and Morgan Chu Chair of the Asian American Studies Center at UCLA. She received her M.A. from UCLA in Asian American Studies and Ph.D. from MIT in Urban Studies. Professor Umemoto’s research centers on issues of democracy, inclusion and collaboration in multicultural societies with a focus on US cities. She has published The Truce: Lessons from an LA Gang War on racialized gang conflict and Jacked Up and Unjust: Pacific Islander Teens Confront Violent Legacies on youth violence in Hawai’i. Her current project is the AAPI Multimedia Textbook, an online open access educational platform to bring Asian American stories into every classroom.

Panelists

Dennis Cha-bin Chen is Associate Dean for Program Delivery and Student Support for the Jack C. Massey College of Business and Associate Professor of International Business and Management at Belmont University. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky specializing in Global Supply Chain Management. His research focus is on minority equity ownership in supply chain governance. His recent works include several studies in global food supply and quality, as well as healthcare delivery and supply. He is a member of the AAPI Steering Committee for Diversity and Inclusion at Belmont University.

Nicole Crane is a faculty member and Professor of Biology in the Natural and Applied Sciences Division at Cabrillo College. She has spent a large part of her career creating educational and research opportunities that support marginalized and underrepresented people and communities. She is also Executive Director of One People One Reef, a collaboration with Micronesian outer island communities to support coral reef management and conservation by bridging traditional practices with modern science. She has established several science education programs focusing on underrepresented students, and was the founder and Principal Investigator of the National Science Foundation Center for Excellence in Marine Advanced Technology Education, and Principal Investigator/Executive Director for Camp SEA Lab. Nicole currently serves as the Interim Executive Director for the Smith Fellowship program at the Society for Conservation Biology.

Peter Nien-chu Kiang (江念祖) is Professor and Director of the Asian American Studies Program at UMass Boston where he has taught since 1987. Peter’s research, teaching, and advocacy in both K-12 and higher education with Asian American immigrant/refugee students and communities have been supported by the National Academy of Education, NEH, and others. At UMass Boston, he has received both the Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award and Distinguished Service Award. Nationally, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Asian American Studies in 2014. He holds a B.A., Ed.M., and Ed.D. from Harvard University and is a former Community Fellow in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT.

Doyuen Ko is Associate Professor of Audio Engineering Technology at Belmont University. He is a graduate of the Chonnam National University in South Korea and holds a M.Mus and a Ph.D. from McGill University, Canada. He is a professional recording engineer and a research team member for international projects including Computer Research in Music and Acoustics at Stanford University, the Japan Broadcasting Corporation, and Skywalker Sound. His most recent publications focus on soundwriting pedagogies for rhetoric and writing. An active participant in Belmont’s AAPI Diversity and Inclusion initiatives, he focuses on the AA perspective as a faculty member from a professional engineering technical discipline.

This workshop is part of the ASDP Regional Center Workshops series.


Image of leaves on a tree

The Inclusive Campus: Focus on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

Regional Center Workshop with the Asian Studies Program at Belmont University

February 3, 2023

Hosted Online: 11:00am Hawaii Time, 4:00pm Eastern Time, 3:00pm Central Time, 1:00pm Pacific Time

REGISTER HERE

This program will explore the dynamics of inclusion with a focus on Asian American and Pacific Islander studies and students. The two-hour webinar will feature a keynote talk on changing the narrative of race relations on American college and university campuses and the communities they serve, followed by a panel discussion reflecting on how best to translate diversity commitments into initiatives that address the needs of AAPI faculty and students.

Keynote Speaker

"Confronting anti-Asian hate with history: Nurturing historical empathy through storytelling"
Karen Umemoto, Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles
Asian Americans experienced a record number of race-motivated hate crimes and incidents during the pandemic. Research has identified the causes of racial violence and tensions historically. While there is no silver bullet to end anti-Asian animus, one of the most promising solutions is education that nurtures historical empathy. Storytelling that brings a human face to Asian Americans and conveys the diversity and humanity among us can change the narrative of race relations in the future. This talk will address renewed efforts to teach Asian American and Ethnic Studies in schools and colleges across the nation, and will include a demonstration of the AAPI Multimedia Textbook prototype as a means of classroom storytelling towards greater human empathy.

Karen Umemoto is a Professor in the Departments of Urban Planning and Asian American Studies and the Helen and Morgan Chu Chair of the Asian American Studies Center at UCLA. She received her M.A. from UCLA in Asian American Studies and Ph.D. from MIT in Urban Studies. Professor Umemoto’s research centers on issues of democracy, inclusion and collaboration in multicultural societies with a focus on US cities. She has published The Truce: Lessons from an LA Gang War on racialized gang conflict and Jacked Up and Unjust: Pacific Islander Teens Confront Violent Legacies on youth violence in Hawai’i. Her current project is the AAPI Multimedia Textbook, an online open access educational platform to bring Asian American stories into every classroom.

Panelists

Dennis Cha-bin Chen is Associate Dean for Program Delivery and Student Support for the Jack C. Massey College of Business and Associate Professor of International Business and Management at Belmont University. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky specializing in Global Supply Chain Management. His research focus is on minority equity ownership in supply chain governance. His recent works include several studies in global food supply and quality, as well as healthcare delivery and supply. He is a member of the AAPI Steering Committee for Diversity and Inclusion at Belmont University.

Nicole Crane is a faculty member and Professor of Biology in the Natural and Applied Sciences Division at Cabrillo College. She has spent a large part of her career creating educational and research opportunities that support marginalized and underrepresented people and communities. She is also Executive Director of One People One Reef, a collaboration with Micronesian outer island communities to support coral reef management and conservation by bridging traditional practices with modern science. She has established several science education programs focusing on underrepresented students, and was the founder and Principal Investigator of the National Science Foundation Center for Excellence in Marine Advanced Technology Education, and Principal Investigator/Executive Director for Camp SEA Lab. Nicole currently serves as the Interim Executive Director for the Smith Fellowship program at the Society for Conservation Biology.

Peter Nien-chu Kiang (江念祖) is Professor and Director of the Asian American Studies Program at UMass Boston where he has taught since 1987. Peter’s research, teaching, and advocacy in both K-12 and higher education with Asian American immigrant/refugee students and communities have been supported by the National Academy of Education, NEH, and others. At UMass Boston, he has received both the Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award and Distinguished Service Award. Nationally, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Asian American Studies in 2014. He holds a B.A., Ed.M., and Ed.D. from Harvard University and is a former Community Fellow in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT.

Doyuen Ko is Associate Professor of Audio Engineering Technology at Belmont University. He is a graduate of the Chonnam National University in South Korea and holds a M.Mus and a Ph.D. from McGill University, Canada. He is a professional recording engineer and a research team member for international projects including Computer Research in Music and Acoustics at Stanford University, the Japan Broadcasting Corporation, and Skywalker Sound. His most recent publications focus on soundwriting pedagogies for rhetoric and writing. An active participant in Belmont’s AAPI Diversity and Inclusion initiatives, he focuses on the AA perspective as a faculty member from a professional engineering technical discipline.

This workshop is part of the ASDP Regional Center Workshops series.