SEMINAR: PATRIMONIALSM AND THE POLITICS OF DEVELOPMENT: Making Informal Governance Work for the Poor

share

This is a listing of older East-West Center events (newer listed first).  See Events to get the list of current or upcoming events.

Politics, Governance, and Security Seminar by Tim Kelsall, Senior Lecturer in Politics, Newcastle University, UK, Visiting Scholar, EWC

When: Aug 14 2007 (All day)
Where: John A. Burns Hall, 3012 (Third Floor), Noon - 1:15 PM
What:

For nearly two decades there has been a consensus in development circles that poverty in Third World countries can be largely explained by the informal politics of their non-developmental states, described variously as patrimonial, patron-clientelistic, personalistic, or just plain corrupt. In the 1990s, the solution to political dysfunction was thought to be democratization and good governance reforms. However, in many states good governance has failed to have the desired developmental effect, and in some cases, democratization has exacerbated patrimonial politics. Academics and donors have begun to ask why there is so little political will, and indeed so little popular demand for reform. One answer is that informal political structures, though developmentally dysfunctional, have considerable local legitimacy. This realization has prompted two further questions: how did today's developmental states transform non-developmental informal structures into developmental ones, or, put slightly differently, can informal politics be made to work for the poor? In 2007, the UK's Department for International Development devoted $7 million to a five year, multi-country study of African countries in an attempt to answer those questions. AusAid is discussing funding a parallel project that targets Melanesia. Dr. Kelsall, one of the lead researchers on the Africa side, is taking this opportunity to showcase the project, hoping to benefit from the local research community's regional knowledge and expertise.

A Visiting Scholar at the East-West Center since October 10, 2006,Dr. Kelsall has taught at the universities of London, Oxford, and Newcastle, and is editor the world's highest impact Africanist journal - African Affairs. His research focuses on cultures of accountability, from grassroots to international level.

Primary Contact Info:
Name: Anna Tanaka
Phone: 944-7607