Seminar on Policies, Institutions, and the Transition to Adulthood: Implications for Fertility Tempo in Low Fertility Settings

share

This is a listing of older East-West Center events (newer listed first).  See Events to get the list of current or upcoming events.

Seminar

When: Feb 13 2008 (All day)
Where: East-West Center Burns Hall 2012
What:

EWC
RESEARCH PROGRAM
AND
UNIVERSITY
OF HAWAI'I
POPULATION STUDIES
PROGRAM
Seminar on Population
and Health




Policies, Institutions, and the Transition to Adulthood:


Implications for Fertility Tempo in Low Fertility Settings


 by

Ronald
R. Rindfuss

Senior Fellow,
East-West
Center

Wednesday, February 13,
2008
12:00
– 1:00 pm


John A. Burns Hall
Room 2012, 2nd floor

 

Abstract.The number of countries experiencing very low fertility with levels well
below replacement level has been rising in recent years and has garnered
increasing academic, political and media attention. Concern over low levels of
period fertility in such countries as Japan, Germany, and Italy includes
deleterious budgetary effects for social programs for the elderly, business
anxiety about a sufficient supply of labor, realization that immigration is a
difficult and unlikely fix, and nationalistic fears related to declining
populations. There is now widespread academic agreement that the postponement of
fertility is a major factor in the very low levels of fertility that have
occurred, and yet most of the policy discussion has been devoted to increasing
the number of children women (and their partners) have. In this paper, we
discuss the factors that have lead to childbearing postponement and policies
that might ameliorate the postponing factors. Specifically, we focus on social
institutions such as the education, labor market, and housing
market.

 

Ronald R. Rindfuss is a
Senior Fellow in the Research Program of the East-West Center. His research interests include
family, fertility and the relationship between population processes and the
environment. In addition to his interests in institutional aspects of low
fertility, he has been working on understanding the profound changes in family
behavior that have been occurring in Japan. He is also using agent-based
models to analyze the relationships among population growth, out-migration,
remittances, and land-use change in his long-term study site in Northeast Thailand.



Primary Contact Info:
Name: Minja Choe
Phone: 944-7475