Professional Development Professional Development
Modern China in Three Keys Faculty Modern China in Three Keys Faculty

PRESENTING FACULTY

Kate LINGLEY (Ph.D. University of Chicago 2004) is Associate Professor of Chinese and Chair of the Art and Art History department at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. Her research focuses on Buddhist votive sculpture of the Northern and Southern Dynasties period, with a particular interest in the social history of religious art. She is interested in the social significance of representation, religious practice, and identity, especially ethnic identity, in a period in which non-Chinese peoples ruled much of North China. This has led to a further interest in Chinese identity in a range of historical periods. The relationship between dress and identity, especially along the Silk Road, has given rise to a second body of research on dress and textiles in medieval China. Professor Lingley's most recent public project was an exhibition of Chinese painting and calligraphy from Honolulu collections that focused on the work of reformers of the 19th and 20th centuries. She is currently working on a book manuscript on women in Buddhist communities of medieval China, as seen through the votive monuments they dedicated.

LUO Yu is Assistant Professor of Anthropology and the Suzanne Wilson Barnett Chair in Contemporary China Studies at the University of Puget Sound. A cultural anthropologist whose research focuses on ethnicity and indigeneity in the Asian borderlands, Dr. Luo is also interested in urban-rural transformations, heritage and tourism, wildlife conservation, and China’s global nexus. Prior to joining the University of Puget Sound, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California Berkeley and an assistant professor at the City University of Hong Kong. Her first book manuscript, currently in progress, examines ethnic branding and cultural politics of the Buyi (Bouyei) in Guizhou, southwest China. Dr. Luo has published in Modern China, Social Anthropology, Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology, Verge: Global Studies in Asias, Social and Cultural Geography, and the International Journal of Heritage Studies. She is also a contributor to the Handbook on Ethnic Minorities in China.

Christopher A. McNALLY is a Professor of Political Economy at Chaminade University and Adjunct Senior Fellow at the East-West Center in Honolulu, USA. His research focuses on comparative capitalisms, especially the nature and logic of Sino-Capitalism. He is at present working on a research project that studies the implications of China’s international reemergence on the global order. He has held fellowships conducting fieldwork and research at the Asia Research Centre in West Australia, the Institute of Asia Pacific Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences. He has edited four volumes, including an examination of China’s political economy: China’s Emergent Political Economy – Capitalism in the Dragon’s Lair (Routledge, 2008). He also has authored numerous book chapters, policy analyses, editorials, and articles in journals such as Business and Politics, Communist and Post-Communist Studies, International Politics, Review of International Political Economy, and World Politics. Dr. McNally earned his Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of Washington and his B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley.

Jonathan PETTIT is Associate Professor of Chinese Religions at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. He earned a dual PhD in Religious Studies and Chinese Literature at Indiana University. Prior to coming to UH, he taught at the University of California, Berkeley and at Purdue University, where he was also the Associate Director of the Center on Religion and Chinese Society. He is a steering committee member of the Global Daoist Studies Forum, the co-chair of the Daoist Studies Unit of American Academy of Religion, and the chair of the Hawai‘i International Conference on Chinese Studies. He is the author of Library of Clouds: A Bibliographic History of Daoist Scriptures (2020) and is working on a book manuscript examining temple construction in medieval Daoist communities.

Kun QIAN is Associate Professor of Chinese Literature and Film at the University of Pittsburgh. She earned her MA in Asian Studies and PhD in East Asian Literature from Cornell University and has master's and undergraduate degrees in economics from Cornell and Peking University. Her research interests range from empire studies, intellectual history, digital media, to economic thought and Metaverse. Her book, The Imperial-Time Order: Literature, Intellectual History, and China's Road to Empire, was published by Brill (2016). She has published substantially on topics such as time-image, eco-cinema, trauma, and historical imagination. She co-directed a documentary film The Revolution They Remember (2020) on the Chinese Cultural Revolution with Edward Gunn, and organized transnational conferences on Metaverse in China (2022). She is currently working on a monograph regarding the political and libidinal economies of Chinese culture in the 20th century.

XU Di is Professor of Education Foundations, College of Education, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She is a member of the Board of Examiners for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE, now CAEP), which provides national accreditations for teacher education programs in the US. Dr. Xu Di has more than two decades of experience in the fields of teacher education, educational foundations, and multicultural and international education, and has published widely in these fields. She has worked as International Consultant in teacher education and educational reforms in Central Asia and Africa for the World Bank, and was a Visiting Scholar and Research Associate at Philosophy of Educational Research Center at Harvard University (1999-2000), a Visiting Professor in Peking University (2009, 2004 and 1997), and an Exchange Professor at National Kaohsiung University in Taiwan (1998). She is committed to live the philosophy she is teaching, and her focus is to live an enlightened life through services to and connections with all.

YANG Guobin is the Grace Lee Boggs Professor of Communication and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, where he directs the Center on Digital Culture and Society and serves as Deputy Director of the Center for the Study of Contemporary China. He studies social movements, digital culture, global communication, and contemporary China. He is the author of The Power of the Internet in China (2009), Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), and The Wuhan Lockdown (2022). He is also the editor or co-editor of six books, the most recent being Engaging Social Media in China: Platforms, Publics and Production (2021, co-edited with Wei Wang).

PRESENTING FACULTY

Kate LINGLEY (Ph.D. University of Chicago 2004) is Associate Professor of Chinese and Chair of the Art and Art History department at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. Her research focuses on Buddhist votive sculpture of the Northern and Southern Dynasties period, with a particular interest in the social history of religious art. She is interested in the social significance of representation, religious practice, and identity, especially ethnic identity, in a period in which non-Chinese peoples ruled much of North China. This has led to a further interest in Chinese identity in a range of historical periods. The relationship between dress and identity, especially along the Silk Road, has given rise to a second body of research on dress and textiles in medieval China. Professor Lingley's most recent public project was an exhibition of Chinese painting and calligraphy from Honolulu collections that focused on the work of reformers of the 19th and 20th centuries. She is currently working on a book manuscript on women in Buddhist communities of medieval China, as seen through the votive monuments they dedicated.

LUO Yu is Assistant Professor of Anthropology and the Suzanne Wilson Barnett Chair in Contemporary China Studies at the University of Puget Sound. A cultural anthropologist whose research focuses on ethnicity and indigeneity in the Asian borderlands, Dr. Luo is also interested in urban-rural transformations, heritage and tourism, wildlife conservation, and China’s global nexus. Prior to joining the University of Puget Sound, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California Berkeley and an assistant professor at the City University of Hong Kong. Her first book manuscript, currently in progress, examines ethnic branding and cultural politics of the Buyi (Bouyei) in Guizhou, southwest China. Dr. Luo has published in Modern China, Social Anthropology, Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology, Verge: Global Studies in Asias, Social and Cultural Geography, and the International Journal of Heritage Studies. She is also a contributor to the Handbook on Ethnic Minorities in China.

Christopher A. McNALLY is a Professor of Political Economy at Chaminade University and Adjunct Senior Fellow at the East-West Center in Honolulu, USA. His research focuses on comparative capitalisms, especially the nature and logic of Sino-Capitalism. He is at present working on a research project that studies the implications of China’s international reemergence on the global order. He has held fellowships conducting fieldwork and research at the Asia Research Centre in West Australia, the Institute of Asia Pacific Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences. He has edited four volumes, including an examination of China’s political economy: China’s Emergent Political Economy – Capitalism in the Dragon’s Lair (Routledge, 2008). He also has authored numerous book chapters, policy analyses, editorials, and articles in journals such as Business and Politics, Communist and Post-Communist Studies, International Politics, Review of International Political Economy, and World Politics. Dr. McNally earned his Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of Washington and his B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley.

Jonathan PETTIT is Associate Professor of Chinese Religions at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. He earned a dual PhD in Religious Studies and Chinese Literature at Indiana University. Prior to coming to UH, he taught at the University of California, Berkeley and at Purdue University, where he was also the Associate Director of the Center on Religion and Chinese Society. He is a steering committee member of the Global Daoist Studies Forum, the co-chair of the Daoist Studies Unit of American Academy of Religion, and the chair of the Hawai‘i International Conference on Chinese Studies. He is the author of Library of Clouds: A Bibliographic History of Daoist Scriptures (2020) and is working on a book manuscript examining temple construction in medieval Daoist communities.

Kun QIAN is Associate Professor of Chinese Literature and Film at the University of Pittsburgh. She earned her MA in Asian Studies and PhD in East Asian Literature from Cornell University and has master's and undergraduate degrees in economics from Cornell and Peking University. Her research interests range from empire studies, intellectual history, digital media, to economic thought and Metaverse. Her book, The Imperial-Time Order: Literature, Intellectual History, and China's Road to Empire, was published by Brill (2016). She has published substantially on topics such as time-image, eco-cinema, trauma, and historical imagination. She co-directed a documentary film The Revolution They Remember (2020) on the Chinese Cultural Revolution with Edward Gunn, and organized transnational conferences on Metaverse in China (2022). She is currently working on a monograph regarding the political and libidinal economies of Chinese culture in the 20th century.

XU Di is Professor of Education Foundations, College of Education, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She is a member of the Board of Examiners for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE, now CAEP), which provides national accreditations for teacher education programs in the US. Dr. Xu Di has more than two decades of experience in the fields of teacher education, educational foundations, and multicultural and international education, and has published widely in these fields. She has worked as International Consultant in teacher education and educational reforms in Central Asia and Africa for the World Bank, and was a Visiting Scholar and Research Associate at Philosophy of Educational Research Center at Harvard University (1999-2000), a Visiting Professor in Peking University (2009, 2004 and 1997), and an Exchange Professor at National Kaohsiung University in Taiwan (1998). She is committed to live the philosophy she is teaching, and her focus is to live an enlightened life through services to and connections with all.

YANG Guobin is the Grace Lee Boggs Professor of Communication and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, where he directs the Center on Digital Culture and Society and serves as Deputy Director of the Center for the Study of Contemporary China. He studies social movements, digital culture, global communication, and contemporary China. He is the author of The Power of the Internet in China (2009), Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), and The Wuhan Lockdown (2022). He is also the editor or co-editor of six books, the most recent being Engaging Social Media in China: Platforms, Publics and Production (2021, co-edited with Wei Wang).