share

Farming with Fire and Water: The Human Ecology of a Composite Swiddening Community in Vietnam's Northern Mountains

by 

Tran Duc Vien, A. Terry Rambo, and Nguyen Thanh Lam (eds.), with the assistance of Neil L. Jamieson and Stephen J. Leisz

Kyoto Area Studies on Asia, Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University, No. 18

Publisher:

Kyoto: Kyoto University Press; Melbourne: Trans Pacific Press

Available From: DA Information Services/Central Book Services (Australia/New Zealand); International Specialized Book Services (USA/Canada); Kinokuniya Company Ltd. (Asia/Pacific)
Publication Date: 2009
ISBN: 978-1-920901-29-5
Binding: cloth
Pages: xxxii, 456

 

Winner of the Silver Prize
Vietnamese Publishers Association annual national book awards

Of approximately 26,000 titles published in 2009, the Vietnamese version of Farming with Fire and Water: The Human Ecology of a Composite Swiddening Community in Vietnam's Northern Mountains, edited by Tran Duc Vien, A. Terry Rambo, and Nguyen Thanh Lam, received the silver (second) prize in the Vietnamese Publishers Association annual national book awards.

Farming with Fire and Water presents a detailed description of the composite swidden system employed by the Da Bac Tay ethnic minority people of Tat hamlet in Hoa Binh Province in Vietnam's Northern Mountain Region (NMR), where slash-and-burn agriculture in swidden fields on the hill slopes (farming with fire) is combined with the cultivation of irrigated paddy fields in the valleys (farming with water). This complex agroecosystem is studied from the perspective of human ecology, the scientific study of human relations with the natural environment. The goal is to understand both how the natural environment influences human society and how human activities affect the natural environment--an interdisciplinary endeavor that involves both natural and social scientists.

This volume brings together a series of individual research reports on soil erosion, nutrient balances, land use, forest management, community social organization, household economics, marketing, and other relevant environmental and social aspects of the community by many of the different researchers who have participated in the human ecological study of Tat hamlet in the years since 1992. This complex and adaptable system, which has evolved over many generations of trial and error experimentation by the Da Bac Tay farmers, should be of special interest to academics engaged in Southeast Asian area studies as well as to applied researchers and development planners who are directly involved in efforts to facilitate rural development in the uplands of Vietnam and elsewhere in the mountains of Southeast Asia.

© Kyoto University Press

share