Contemporary Issues in Asia and the Pacific Contemporary Issues in Asia and the Pacific
Rise of the Red Engineers: The Cultural Revolution and the Origins of China's New Class Rise of the Red Engineers: The Cultural Revolution and the Origins of China's New Class
Format
paper
Pages
368
ISBN
978-0-8047-6078-2

Winner of the 2009 Outstanding Academic Title Award, sponsored by Choice.

Rise of the Red Engineers is the fourteenth title in the East-West Center book series, Contemporary Issues in Asia and the Pacific, published by Stanford University Press.

How did the Chinese Communist Party, which came to power promising to eliminate class distinctions, including those based on education, end up creating a highly hierarchical society presided over by technocratic officials? Joel Andreas chronicles how the CCP came to abandon class leveling in favor of technocratic policies. After 1949, poorly educated peasant revolutionaries uneasily shared the top echelons of society with members of China's educated elite. These contending elites gradually coalesced, as revolutionary cadres' children gained educational credentials and intellectuals' children joined the ruling party. It was Mao's attacks on both groups during the Cultural Revolution, however, that spurred inter-elite political unity and paved the way--after his death--for the consolidation of a technocratic class that combined their political and cultural resources. This story is told through a case study of Tsinghua University, China's premier school of technology, which was at the epicenter of these conflicts and became the preferred training ground for technocrats, including many of China's current leaders.

 

Details and ordering information at
Stanford University Press

Contents
Preface
Introduction
  1. PART 1. BUILDING SOCIALISM (1949-1966)
  2. Political Foundations of Class Power
  3. Cultural Foundations of Class Power
  4. Cradle of Red Engineers

    PART 2. THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION (1966-1968)
     
  5. Political Versus Cultural power
  6. Uniting to Defend Political and Cultural Power

    PART 3. INSTITUTIONALIZING THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION (1968-1976)
     
  7. Supervising the Red Engineers
  8. Eliminating the Distinction Between Mental and Manual Labor
  9. Worker-Peasant-Soldier Students

    PART 4. THE NEW ERA (1976-PRESENT)
     
  10. Rebuilding the Foundations of Political and Cultural Power
  11. Triumph of the Red Engineers
  12. Technocracy and Capitalism
Conclusion
Appendix 1: Tsinghua University Faculty, Production Workers, and Students, 1949-1992
Appendix 2: List of Interviewees
Abbreviations
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Winner of the 2009 Outstanding Academic Title Award, sponsored by Choice.

Rise of the Red Engineers is the fourteenth title in the East-West Center book series, Contemporary Issues in Asia and the Pacific, published by Stanford University Press.

How did the Chinese Communist Party, which came to power promising to eliminate class distinctions, including those based on education, end up creating a highly hierarchical society presided over by technocratic officials? Joel Andreas chronicles how the CCP came to abandon class leveling in favor of technocratic policies. After 1949, poorly educated peasant revolutionaries uneasily shared the top echelons of society with members of China's educated elite. These contending elites gradually coalesced, as revolutionary cadres' children gained educational credentials and intellectuals' children joined the ruling party. It was Mao's attacks on both groups during the Cultural Revolution, however, that spurred inter-elite political unity and paved the way--after his death--for the consolidation of a technocratic class that combined their political and cultural resources. This story is told through a case study of Tsinghua University, China's premier school of technology, which was at the epicenter of these conflicts and became the preferred training ground for technocrats, including many of China's current leaders.

 

Details and ordering information at
Stanford University Press

Contents
Preface
Introduction
  1. PART 1. BUILDING SOCIALISM (1949-1966)
  2. Political Foundations of Class Power
  3. Cultural Foundations of Class Power
  4. Cradle of Red Engineers

    PART 2. THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION (1966-1968)
     
  5. Political Versus Cultural power
  6. Uniting to Defend Political and Cultural Power

    PART 3. INSTITUTIONALIZING THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION (1968-1976)
     
  7. Supervising the Red Engineers
  8. Eliminating the Distinction Between Mental and Manual Labor
  9. Worker-Peasant-Soldier Students

    PART 4. THE NEW ERA (1976-PRESENT)
     
  10. Rebuilding the Foundations of Political and Cultural Power
  11. Triumph of the Red Engineers
  12. Technocracy and Capitalism
Conclusion
Appendix 1: Tsinghua University Faculty, Production Workers, and Students, 1949-1992
Appendix 2: List of Interviewees
Abbreviations
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Contemporary Issues in Asia and the Pacific