Research Noon Seminar Series

share

The East-West Center Research Program Noon Seminar Series seeks to disseminate research and policy findings on environmental, social, economic, political, and international relations issues in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. The Noon Seminar Series invites scholars, advocates, and government officials from throughout the U.S., Asia, and the Pacific to share their findings with colleagues and students through a series of presentations in Honolulu. By capturing these talks on the East-West Center website, the Center makes these research and policy findings available to a broader audience of planners, academics, policymakers, regional specialists, the media, and the general public.

May 31, 2019 Seminar: Shimrit Perkol-Finkel on "Blue is the New Green – Ecological Enhancement of Urban Waterfronts and Coastal Infrastructure"

With two-thirds of the human population concentrated around coastlines accelerated coastal development and changes to natural coastlines are inevitable. Over time, natural coastlines undergo severe changes, and in many cases are completely overtaken by industrial facilities, coastal defense measures, and residential properties. Read more...

May 7, 2019 Seminar: Md. Azmeary Ferdoush on "Symbolic spaces: Citizenship and state-making along the border of Bangladesh and India"

Almost 55,000 people lived in the de facto stateless spaces known as enclaves along the border of Bangladesh and India until 2015. Enclaves were pieces of one state inside another where residents lacked access to basic rights, such as health, education and legal protection. Read More...

April 5, 2019 Seminar: Layla M. Kilolu on "Engaging underrepresented groups in urban resilience strategies"

Resilience strategies, climate action plans, and disaster preparedness plans are tools that cities are increasingly developing in order to address future challenges. How are cities thinking about and engaging their vulnerable communities and groups that have historically not been part of planning processes? Read More...

March 29, 2019 Seminar: Mohd Mizan bin Mohammad Aslam on "Religious Radicalism and Deradicalization Program for SOSMA Detainees in Malaysia"

Developments in recent years have revealed that the world is facing a global terrorism challenge that has become a major security issue for many countries around the world including Malaysia. Since 1969, Malaysia has recorded 13 extremist militant groups that were operating in the country. Read More...

March 28, 2019 Seminar: Pitman B. Potter on "The Role of Human Rights in China’s International Economic Relations"

Over the past decade, China has expanded its international economic relationships while also intensifying political and policy pressure to advance Beijing’s position on human rights. Despite international legal standards to the contrary, China has promoted a human rights discourse that elevates stability and economic accumulation over political and civil rights. Read More...

March 19, 2019 Seminar: Abby Frazier on "Geospatial Analysis of Climate Variability in the Pacific: Drought Impacts and Management"

Drought is a significant feature of the climate in Hawai‘i and the U.S-Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI), with severe impacts across multiple sectors. This talk presents an overview of drought in Hawai‘i and the USAPI. Read More...

March 8, 2019 Seminar: Laura Hosman on "Improving educational opportunities in remote Pacific Islands: The SolarSPELL Digital Library"

The Pacific Islands are globally regarded as a barometer and first line of impact for climate change. In addition to their geographic predisposition to extreme weather events, the remote and isolated nature of these islands creates infrastructural challenges—such as lack of internet connectivity—which contribute to educational challenges. Read More...

March 5, 2019 Seminar: Michael S. Bruno on "THE URBAN OCEAN—The Interaction of Cities with Water"

The earth has become increasingly urban in character, with the number of megacities (population greater than 10 million) quadrupling to nearly 40 over the past 30 years. A majority of these cities are located on the coastal ocean, meaning that a growing share of the world’s population is not only benefiting from the climate and resources of the coastal ocean but also contributing to the myriad environmental stressors to this vital ecosystem. Read More...

February 28, 2019 Seminar: Aulani Wilhelm on "Ocean conservation in a changing climate"

It is hard to escape the reality that our climate is rapidly changing—in the natural world, and otherwise. Trends that used to be predictable are erratic. Temporary shifts, such as weather, that allowed us to adapt to momentary changes and return once again to equilibrium are no longer able to prepare us for the broader, more long-lasting changes to come. Read More...

February 27, 2019 Seminar: Jože Sambt on "Intergenerational transfers in Slovenia over time"

Since gaining independence in 1991, Slovenia has experienced major changes, including a transition from self‑management socialism to a democratic and pluralistic society with a capitalist market economy. At the same time, population is ageing very rapidly. Read More...

February 19, 2019 Seminar: Phanwin Yokying on "Parents’ labor force participation and children’s involvement in work activities: Evidence from Thailand"

Is children’s involvement in market and household work related to the labor force status of their mothers and fathers? Among children with employed parents, is there a relationship between parents’ sector of employment and the work performed by children?And how does poverty affect the relationship between parents’ informal employment and work performed by children?  Read More...

February 13, 2019 Seminar: Pamela DeLargy on "Convincing the Cowboys: How Gender Became Part of Humanitarian Response Standards"

This presentation will discuss the decades-long struggles (and successes) within the humanitarian community to expand emergency response from the logistics of supplying food, water and shelter to include considerations of equal access to assistance, protection from harm, and empowerment of women and girls. Read More...

February 8, 2019 Seminar: Ellen B. Stechel on "The future of fuels in the energy transition in the Asia-Pacific"

Hydrogen is an emerging industry with significant potential to deliver economic opportunity from wealth creation and jobs, fuel security, and environmental benefits to many regions in the world. The International Energy Agency estimates that the global market for hydrogen will reach $215 billion by 2022. Read More...

February 5, 2019 Seminar: Michael A. Tamor on "Global warming in round numbers—toward a zero-carbon economy"

Evidence for rising global temperatures and evidence of the human role in causing most of that rise—by burning fossil fuels—is overwhelming. Yet humanity is not behaving as if threatened by the crisis that climate models predict. As entrenched interests and ‘science deniers’ obscure data to claim no action is necessary or the cure is worse than the disease and activists seek to bend the climate imperative to other social goals, the broader public is left threatened and confused.  Read More...

February 1, 2019 Seminar: Nathan Johnson and Samantha Janko on "Preparing the future workforce for a changing energy economy"

Distributed energy resources and microgrids have become more common in the last decade for humanitarian, defense, and industry applications both on and off the grid. This growth is being driven by the declining cost of renewables and increasing societal interest in energy access, autonomy, resiliency, and sustainability. Read More...

January 15, 2019 Seminar: Bixia Chen on "Homestead Trees in Island Topography, the Cultural and Historical Context, and Present Challenges"

Fengshui was introduced to Okinawa, Japan, then the Ryukyu Kingdom, at the end of the 14th Century by Chinese immigrants. Fengshui has had a profound influence on the settlement of the landscape, cemetery construction, landscape tree planting, and forestry management. The essential concept of fengshui in the Ryukyu Islands is hougo (抱護), literally meaning “embraced protection.” Read More...

January 7, 2019 Seminar: Taylor Marshall on "A Cost-Effective and Common-Sense Approach to Climate Change"

Landscape scale reforestation is proven, cost effective and shovel-ready; indeed, forests are the most effective carbon sinks on earth. With reforestation we can reduce global warming by 0.5°C by the end of the century. Read More...

January 3, 2019 Seminar: Greg Asner on "Big data and AI: Leveraging technology to map complex ecosystems from forests to corals"

Photo of Greg Asner's noon seminarForest carbon monitoring methods, invented in Hawaii, are now globally accepted. Asner discusses his CLASlite forest monitoring project, which provides deforestation monitoring software and training to government and private organizations in more than 130 countries. Read More...

December 4, 2018 Seminar: Charles Yuji Horioka on "Does Culture Matter? Evidence from Saving and Bequest Behavior in Japan"

Do individuals in all countries behave rationally or is their behavior influenced by their country’s culture, traditions, and social norms? This presentation attempts to shed light on this question as it relates to saving and bequest behavior in Japan. Read More...

December 3, 2018 Seminar: Yoko Niimi on "Does Marriage Really Help Women Accumulate Wealth? Evidence from Japan"

This presentation examines whether marriage helps women accumulate wealth in Japan. Measuring wealth in terms of household wealth and in terms of personal wealth, these findings underscore the fact that women in Japan are potentially in a financially vulnerable position even after they marry. Read More...

November 27, 2018 Seminar: Xiaojun Li on "Market Liberalization, Commercial Interests, and China’s Economic Statecraft toward North Korea"

Years of isolation have left North Korea economically reliant on China. Today, diplomatic efforts to contain North Korea's nuclear ambitions depend on China's ability and willingness to control trade between the two nations. After three decades of market reform, however, less than 20% of China’s trade with North Korea is now in the hands of state-owned enterprises (SOEs). Read More...

November 7, 2018 Seminar: Tim Brown on "Evolving HIV epidemics: The urgent need to refocus on key populations"

Many claim that HIV epidemics in Asia are increasingly shifting toward the general population, requiring a refocusing of prevention efforts. This presentation explores the evidence from modeling HIV epidemics in the countries of Asia and explores the evidence related to this claim. Read More...

Ocotber 18, 2018 Seminar: Satu Limaye on "US-Indo Pacific relations on the eve of 2018 US mid-terms and Indo-Pacific summits"

Soon after the November 6 mid-term elections in the U.S., key regional summits such as the East Asia Summit will take place in the Indo-Pacific. Vice President Pence will represent the U.S. instead of President Trump. Given Pence’s recent hard-hitting speech on China, and multiple other factors, how should we assess the state of U.S.-Indo-Pacific relations? Read More...

October 17, 2018 Seminar: Valentina Dinica on "Protected areas and commercial tourism: Governance resilience and vulnerabilities in New Zealand and Hawaii"

Countries around the world face the dual challenge of reversing ecosystem degradation while sustaining tourism. The presentation highlights key findings for several National Parks in New Zealand and preliminary findings for protected areas in Hawaii. Read More...

September 18, 2018 Seminar: Wentao Li on "The free trade area of Asia Pacific: Opportunities and challenges"

In recent years, several regional superpowers have made it clear that a tougher trade protectionism will be their priority, which presents a challenge to the progress of Asia-Pacific regional economic integration. Read More...

August 31, 2018 Seminar: Craig Martin on "Lessons from Japan on the legitimacy of informal constitutional amendment"

The government of Japan purported to "reinterpret" the famous war-renouncing provision of the Constitution of Japan, Article 9, in the summer of 2014. It did so in a manner that deliberately circumvented the formal amendment procedure, and the "reinterpretation" itself was a radical departure from established understanding of the provision. Read More...

August 21, 2018 Seminar: Keith Bettinger on "Empowering institutions to address climate change: Experience from Papua New Guinea and elsewhere"

There is widespread recognition for the need to address global warming and climate change. A global financial architecture has emerged to support climate mitigation and adaptation initiatives.  However, significant gaps have emerged between the intent to mitigate and adapt. Read More...

July 31, 2018 Seminar: Katie Hoffman on "The trillion plus opportunity: Investing to reverse global warming"

Trillions of dollars are needed annually to meet global goals for sustainable development and the Paris Climate Accords. In light of these global commitments, policy makers and investors are struggling to integrate climate financing strategies at the scale commensurate with the opportunity. Read More...

July 19, 2018 Seminar: Martin Chungong on "Transforming the SDGs into everyday reality: The role of parliaments"

Parliaments play an important role in contributing to the implementation and realization of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Strong parliaments are at the heart of democracy and good governance. They are central to ensuring that national efforts, policies, and programs deliver benefits for all people. Read More...

July 2, 2018 Seminar: Lorenz Gonschor on "A Hawaiian’s impressions in foreign lands: The writings of 19th century Hawaiian diplomat Henry Poor"

Henry F. Poor (1856–1899) was one of the Hawaiian Kingdom’s prime diplomats. He was dispatched to circumnavigate the globe in 1883–1884 and to Sāmoa in 1886–1887. Of both aboriginal Hawaiian and New England descent, Poor’s life exemplifies the cultural and political tensions inherent in late nineteenth century Hawaiian society. Read More...

May 15, 2018 Seminar: Sumeet Saksena on "Supply-side, gender, and migration-related determinants of household cooking energy choices"

Around 3 billion people cook and heat their homes using polluting fuels (i.e. wood, coal, dung, kerosene) and inefficient technologies. According to the World Health Organization, around 4 million people, mainly women and children, die from exposure to household air pollution every year. Read More...

May 7, 2018 Seminar: Andrew Beckmann on "Dangerous waters: The escalating water conflict in the Indus River Basin"

Recently Pakistan has become one of the least water secure nations in the world and faces an impending water crisis. Pakistan’s severe water shortages highlight its dependence on the Indus River Basin and bring to the forefront a conflict with India over control of the basin. Read More...

May 1, 2018 Seminar: Nancy Riley on "Chinese and public health in Hawai`i: Becoming citizen-subjects"

This seminar traces the place of Chinese in discourses of public health, in the medical community and particularly with the Board of Health, to reflect on the how Chinese moved from plantation laborers to successful members of Hawai`i society. Read More...

April 18, 2018 Seminar: Denny Roy on "Taiwan Cross-Strait Relations Update"

For the past decade Taiwan has been the quiet East Asia “flashpoint” compared to North Korea and the East China Sea.  But the situation that previously produced three Taiwan Strait crises remains unresolved, and with China newly emboldened under Xi Jinping and the independence-leaning party in power in Taipei, a fourth crisis may be brewing. Read More...

April 11, 2018 Seminar: Deiter Ernst on "China’s push into Artificial Intelligence –Zero-sum game or catalyst for cooperation?"

China faces a huge gap between its exploding data pool and its capacity for data analysis. This talk reviews China’s AI strategy and key stakeholders in China’s AI industry and provides a bird’s-eye view of China’s perceived AI strengths and weaknesses. Read More...

March 29, 2018 Seminar: Kevin Woods on "The War to Rule: Ceasefire capitalism and state-making in Burma’s borderlands"

The war to rule in Burma – the fight to bring rebel frontier landscapes and ethnic minority populations under control of the lowland military state – has continued during the country’s celebrated opening to global capital by “turning land into capital” and “battlefields to marketplaces.” Read More...

March 20, 2018 Seminar: Laura Brewington on The regional biosecurity plan for Micronesia and Hawaii

Non-native, invasive species pose threats to environmental, economic, cultural, and social systems around the world. Biosecurity systems exist to try to limit the introduction of plants, animals, and other organisms that could potentially invade a new area and cause harm. Read More...

March 14, 2018 Seminar: Pitman Potter on Art and law in China: Dynamics of domination and resistance

The relationship between law and art in contemporary China reveals important dynamics of the PRC legal system. Law in China has long been used to prevent and punish artistic expression with which the ruling regime disagrees. Read More...

March 12, 2018 Seminar: Wang Feng on "China’s clean air policy and citizens’ satisfaction with air quality based on field investigation data"

In order to test citizen satisfaction with the government’s environmental information disclosure policy and other clean air policies, Professor Wang’s research team conducted face-to-face interviews in the city of Xi’an, Shaanxi provence. Read More...

March 8, 2018 Seminar: Durga Poudel on "Climate change is affecting small-holder farming system and water sources in the mid-hill region of Nepal"

Video of Durga Poudel's presentation The mid-hill region of Nepal is experiencing a heavy burden of climate change impacts. Changing rainfall patterns, low crop yields, increased diseases and parasites in animals, drying drinking water sources, forest degradation, and declining river discharges are some of the major climate change impacts in the region. Read More...

February 28, 2018 Seminar: Pitman Pitter on "Coordinating performance of international trade and human rights standards"

Video of Pitman Potter's talk on 2/28/18Coordinating trade policy and human rights is a critical issue for the world today. Trade policy has direct significance for human rights in matters such as labour relations, environmental protection, health care, and housing - particularly in developing economies. Read More...

February 27, 2018 Seminar: Boy Luethje on "Green cars―low wages? Changing value chains in the automotive industry in China"

Video of Boy Luethje's presentation China is a leading force in new-energy vehicles, digital cars, and shared mobility. Driven by ambitious government policies and massive urban transformation, China has emerged as the world’s largest market and production site for electric vehicles. Read More...

February 20, 2018 Seminar: Allen Clark on "The emerging “Golden Era” of mineral development in the Pacific Ocean"

Deep-sea exploration projects have identified valuable deposits of gold, silver, copper, nickel, and cobalt across the Pacific—both in the open ocean under international jurisdiction and in the territorial waters of several Pacific Island nations. Read More...

January 30, 2018 Seminar: Dina Wahyuni on “The UN Sustainable Development Goals: Stakeholders’ Engagement with the Agenda

Video of Dina Wahyuni's presentation In September 2015, after three years of negotiations and debate, 193 countries agreed to a set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aimed at ending poverty, protecting the environment, and ensuring prosperity for all by 2030. The agreement expresses a consensus by governments that the SDGs can only be achieved with the involvement of all stakeholders. Read more...

January 19, 2018 Seminar: Jonna Estudillo on "Maternal Mortality on Lao PDR"

Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR) has the highest maternal mortality ratio in Southeast Asia, with 197 women dying in 2015 from causes related to pregnancy or childbirth for every 100,000 live births. Most of these deaths could be prevented. Read more...

share