Training & Exchanges
2023 Jefferson Fellowships 2023 Jefferson Fellowships
May 07, 2023 - May 28, 2023
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Contact
Susan Kreifels
+1.808.944.7176 +1.808.944.7176

Inequality in the US and Asia: Drivers, Consequences, and Policy Responses

Dates: May 2023

Destinations: Honolulu, Hawaiʻi; Hong Kong (virtual); Tokyo & TBD, Japan; Jakarta, Indonesia

Congratulations to the 2023 Jefferson Fellows:

  • Mr. Jon Viktor CABUENAS, Content Producer, GMA News Online, Manila, Philippines
  • Mr. Efrain HERNANDEZ Jr., Assistant Foreign & National Editor, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, USA
  • Ms. Katie JOHNSTON, Labor Reporter, The Boston Globe, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  • Mr. Shih-Shiang LIAO, News Anchor & Reporter, Era News, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Ms. Kinling LO, Reporter, South China Morning Post, Hong Kong SAR
  • Mr. Faisal MAHMUD, Features Editor, Fintech Magazine, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • Mr. Fayaz NAICH, Journalist/Analyst, Karachi, Pakistan
  • Ms. Repeka NASIKO, Senior News Reporter, The Fiji Times, Lautoka, Fiji
  • Mr. Porimol PALMA, Diplomatic Correspondent, The Daily Star, Dhaka, Bangadesh
  • Ms. Olivera PERKINS, Economics Reporter, Signal Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
  • Ms. Luiza SAVAGE, Executive Director, Editorial Initiatives, POLITICO, Washington, DC, USA

A three-week dialogue, reporting, and hybridized travel program to Honolulu, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Jakarta will contextualize and compare widening disparities of income, wealth, and opportunity within the United States and Asia. The program will enable journalists to better understand the distributional consequences of technological change, globalization, and market reforms, which arguably favor skilled over unskilled labor, capital over labor, and urban and coastal areas over rural areas. The proposed theme will also explore how income and wealth inequalities are reinforced by inequitable access to opportunity in such critical areas as education, healthcare, financing and credit, housing, and infrastructure. Opportunity disparities resulting from gender, racial, ethnic, and nativist discrimination will also be addressed as will the politicization of inequality, its impact on polarization and declining public trust, and how affected governments are responding.

Despite low rates of poverty and unemployment, inequality in the United States has hit its highest level in 50 years, according to the Census Bureau. The gap is greatest in New York, Connecticut, California, and Washington, DC and lowest in Utah, Alaska, New Hampshire, Wyoming, and Hawaiʻi. This variance across states highlights the important role that policies, institutions, and demographics play. The 2022 Jefferson Fellowships program will begin in Honolulu with expert-led sessions on inequality in the US and the Asia Pacific region. Journalists will additionally share perspectives from their own countries on the drivers, consequences, and policy responses related to inequality through topic papers and presentations. Site visits in Honolulu will also provide opportunities to observe how growing inequity is affecting one of United States’ most racially and ethnically diverse states and how policymakers and grassroots organizations are responding.

The Asia Pacific region has for several decades witnessed extraordinary economic development, however, growth has not been balanced or inclusive. Hong Kong is one of the world’s richest and most inequitable cities, in which the wealthiest households earn almost 44 times what the poorest families earn and one in five residents lives below the poverty line. Virtual travel to Hong Kong will allow journalists to discern some the socio-economic inequities underpinning the current unrest, including the city’s changing demographics; escalating housing prices; and tax policies, which favor concentrated wealth. In contrast, Japan, has long been considered one of the world’s most equitable developed countries due to income and inheritance tax policies that hinder the accumulation of capital over generations as well as social security benefits that significantly raise the net incomes of the country’s low-income citizens. Inequality, however, is on the rise driven by a greying of society; intergenerational, gender, and urban-rural wealth disparities; and the growth of irregular (hiseiki) employment over life-long employment. In-person travel to Tokyo will examine Japan’s crumbling egalitarianism and the Abe administration’s response. In-person travel to Jakarta will similarly examine the drivers underpinning Indonesia’s widening income and wealth inequality, including urbanization; foreign direct investment into skill intensive industries; low wages and insecure employment for low skilled workers; and gender gaps in educational attainment and labor participation. The Jakarta study tour will also explore policy efforts taken by the Joko Widodo government to expand social assistance programs, improve access to infrastructure, and address education disparity. Finally, meetings with government officials, security officers, academics, media colleagues, students, civil society leaders, and immigrants will provide first-hand exposure to and a more nuanced understanding of the theme and will build the professional networks of participating journalists.

Inequality in the US and Asia: Drivers, Consequences, and Policy Responses

Dates: May 2023

Destinations: Honolulu, Hawaiʻi; Hong Kong (virtual); Tokyo & TBD, Japan; Jakarta, Indonesia

Congratulations to the 2023 Jefferson Fellows:

  • Mr. Jon Viktor CABUENAS, Content Producer, GMA News Online, Manila, Philippines
  • Mr. Efrain HERNANDEZ Jr., Assistant Foreign & National Editor, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, USA
  • Ms. Katie JOHNSTON, Labor Reporter, The Boston Globe, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  • Mr. Shih-Shiang LIAO, News Anchor & Reporter, Era News, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Ms. Kinling LO, Reporter, South China Morning Post, Hong Kong SAR
  • Mr. Faisal MAHMUD, Features Editor, Fintech Magazine, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • Mr. Fayaz NAICH, Journalist/Analyst, Karachi, Pakistan
  • Ms. Repeka NASIKO, Senior News Reporter, The Fiji Times, Lautoka, Fiji
  • Mr. Porimol PALMA, Diplomatic Correspondent, The Daily Star, Dhaka, Bangadesh
  • Ms. Olivera PERKINS, Economics Reporter, Signal Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
  • Ms. Luiza SAVAGE, Executive Director, Editorial Initiatives, POLITICO, Washington, DC, USA

A three-week dialogue, reporting, and hybridized travel program to Honolulu, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Jakarta will contextualize and compare widening disparities of income, wealth, and opportunity within the United States and Asia. The program will enable journalists to better understand the distributional consequences of technological change, globalization, and market reforms, which arguably favor skilled over unskilled labor, capital over labor, and urban and coastal areas over rural areas. The proposed theme will also explore how income and wealth inequalities are reinforced by inequitable access to opportunity in such critical areas as education, healthcare, financing and credit, housing, and infrastructure. Opportunity disparities resulting from gender, racial, ethnic, and nativist discrimination will also be addressed as will the politicization of inequality, its impact on polarization and declining public trust, and how affected governments are responding.

Despite low rates of poverty and unemployment, inequality in the United States has hit its highest level in 50 years, according to the Census Bureau. The gap is greatest in New York, Connecticut, California, and Washington, DC and lowest in Utah, Alaska, New Hampshire, Wyoming, and Hawaiʻi. This variance across states highlights the important role that policies, institutions, and demographics play. The 2022 Jefferson Fellowships program will begin in Honolulu with expert-led sessions on inequality in the US and the Asia Pacific region. Journalists will additionally share perspectives from their own countries on the drivers, consequences, and policy responses related to inequality through topic papers and presentations. Site visits in Honolulu will also provide opportunities to observe how growing inequity is affecting one of United States’ most racially and ethnically diverse states and how policymakers and grassroots organizations are responding.

The Asia Pacific region has for several decades witnessed extraordinary economic development, however, growth has not been balanced or inclusive. Hong Kong is one of the world’s richest and most inequitable cities, in which the wealthiest households earn almost 44 times what the poorest families earn and one in five residents lives below the poverty line. Virtual travel to Hong Kong will allow journalists to discern some the socio-economic inequities underpinning the current unrest, including the city’s changing demographics; escalating housing prices; and tax policies, which favor concentrated wealth. In contrast, Japan, has long been considered one of the world’s most equitable developed countries due to income and inheritance tax policies that hinder the accumulation of capital over generations as well as social security benefits that significantly raise the net incomes of the country’s low-income citizens. Inequality, however, is on the rise driven by a greying of society; intergenerational, gender, and urban-rural wealth disparities; and the growth of irregular (hiseiki) employment over life-long employment. In-person travel to Tokyo will examine Japan’s crumbling egalitarianism and the Abe administration’s response. In-person travel to Jakarta will similarly examine the drivers underpinning Indonesia’s widening income and wealth inequality, including urbanization; foreign direct investment into skill intensive industries; low wages and insecure employment for low skilled workers; and gender gaps in educational attainment and labor participation. The Jakarta study tour will also explore policy efforts taken by the Joko Widodo government to expand social assistance programs, improve access to infrastructure, and address education disparity. Finally, meetings with government officials, security officers, academics, media colleagues, students, civil society leaders, and immigrants will provide first-hand exposure to and a more nuanced understanding of the theme and will build the professional networks of participating journalists.