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Previous Events at the East-West Center in Washington



March 25 Event: Aligned Allies: The Japan-Australia Security Partnership and the Asian Security Order  

Malcolm Cook, a Senior Fellow at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore,discussed the strengths and challenges facing the Japan-Australia bilateral alliance and what that meant for their interactions with the United States. Read more...



March 11 Event: Post-Arbitration Scenarios for the South China Sea Disputes: Continuing Crises or Opportunities for US and ASEAN?  

Jay Batongbacal, Director of the University of the Philippines' Law Center, and RADM (ret.) Mike McDevitt, a Senior Fellow at the Center for Naval Analysis, frankly discussed the possible scenarios facing the Philippines and China once the Philippines' arbitration on the South China Sea is decided. Read more...


Dr. Michito Tsuruoka, Senior Research Fellow, National Institute for Defense StudiesMarch 9 Event: The Ukraine Crisis and Japan’s Russia Challenge 

In an off-the -record seminar, National Institute for Defense Studies Senior Fellow Dr. Michito Tsuruoka discussed how Japanese perceived the ongoing crisis in Ukraine and what that meant for both current and future Japan-Russia relations. Read more...


From left to right: Dr. Jun Makita, Dr. Aki Sakabe-Mori, Dr. Shinsuke Tomotsugu, and Dr. Ellen Frost (EWCW, Moderator)March 3 Event: New Voices from Japan: Changing Economy, Rivalry with China, and Nuclear Policy  

In partnership with the Sasakawa Peace Foundation and Social Science Research Council, a panel of experts traveled from Japan to the East-West Center in Washington to speak on a variety of topics including Japan's economic reforms, Japanese sentiments surrounding China's Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), and the history as well as the future of Japan's civilian nuclear energy. Read more...


From left to right: Dr. Satu Limaye, Professor Akio Takahara, Mr. Nathaniel Ahrens and Ms. Susan Lawrence.February 26 Event: China's Xi Jinping Administration: An Assessment of Achievements and Challenges  

In partnership with the US-Japan Research Institute (USJI) as part of their USJI Week 2015, a panel of experts traveled to the East-West Center in Washington to give a progress report on the status of Chinese President Xi Jinping's anti-corruption campaign, among other reforms, and their outlook on both his and China's future. Read more...


From left to right: Dr. Andrew Oros, Dr. Satu Limaye, Dr. Ellen Frost, and Mr. Matthew DaleyFebruary 18 Event: Goldstein Program in Public Affairs: The Growing Importance of Asia for the United States 

During an event co-sponsored by the East-West Center in Washington and Washington College in Chesterton, Maryland, a panel of experts weighed in on the increasing complexity of interactions between the United States and countries in the Asia-Pacific. Read more...


Ms. Aiko Shimizu discusses the potential of the ongoing clean energy initiative between Hawaii and Okinawa.December 15 Event: Powering Paradises: Policy Recommendations and Implications for the Hawai’i-Okinawa Clean Energy Initiative in Security, Development and International Cooperation 

In an off-the -record seminar, EWCW Japan Studies Fellow Aiko Shimizu outlined the background of the Hawai’i-Okinawa Clean Energy Initiative and discussed how the initiative could be expanded to improve both islands' sustainability and national security. Read more...


Dr. Vitaly Kozyrev, Dr. William Norris and Dr. Satu Limaye discussion the likelihood of convergence between China and Russia in Eurasia, where both seek to pursue similar goals. December 15 Event: Russian-Chinese Integration Strategies for Eurasia: Forming a New Condominium? 

Two major regional actors – Russia and China – each increasingly regard the Eurasian heartland as their strategic backyard. The regional ambitions of these two rising powers threaten a new era of competition –or possibly cooperation- in Eurasia. Will Moscow and Beijing build a new condominium in Eurasia? Or will China’s new economic offensive (strategy) challenge Russia’s effort to form an independent power center in Eurasia? Will Moscow’s competition with an even more assertive and resourceful China unleash its productive potential or l lead to Russia’s geopolitical failure in the Eurasian heartland and undermine its status as a regional great power? In his remarks, Dr. Vitaly Kozyrev explored these issues of Russo-Chinese strategic coordination in Eurasia in the context of China’s expansionist regional ambitions and Moscow’s growing political and economic dependency on China. Dr. William Norris served as a discussant and offer his insights on China’s interactions in Eurasia. Read more...


Ms. Priscilla Clapp outlines what is in store for Myanmar is its elections approach next year.December 12 Event: Myanmar’s Election Year and US Policy 

 Having wound up its year as chair of ASEAN, Myanmar is now turning attention to preparations for next year’s election and we can expect the political environment to become intensely competitive and unpredictable. During his recent visit President Obama highlighted a number of concerns about the challenges facing Myanmar at this point in its transition and vowed that the United States would remain fully engaged as the country moves forward. At the same time, others see these challenges as signs that Myanmar’s transition has stalled and argue that the United State should begin to reinstate punitive measures that limit engagement. Priscilla Clapp discussed the main issues playing out in the run up to Myanmar’s elections and how they could affect the post-election landscape. She will examine the question of what constitutes “backsliding” in the Myanmar context and options for U.S. policy responses. Read more...


 

Mr. David Timberman and Dr. Satu Limaye candidly discuss the future of President Aquino's reforms following the upcoming Filipino presidential election in 2016.December 3 Event: Reformism in the Philippines: Can Recent Gains be Sustained? 

In an off-the record seminar, David Timberman spoke candidly on the the successes and setbacks of the Aquino administration in the Philippines, as well as whether current reforms would continue following elections in 2016.  Read more...

 

 


Ms. Tomoko Kiyota and Dr. Satu Limaye discuss the future of Japan-India bilateral security cooperation.November 20 Event: The Future of Japan-India Security Cooperation 

 Since Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori visited New Delhi in August 2000, relations between India and Japan have changed dramatically. While a number of scholars have explained this new phenomenon as a product of both countries’ mutual concerns about China, they tend to ignore two important facts. First, without the reform of Japanese national security policy and the broadening of Japan’s Self-Defense Forces (SDF)’s area of activities, security cooperation between Tokyo and New Delhi would lack substantive efforts. Second, Japan-US relations and India-US relations have impacted the Japan-India bilateral relationship more than previously thought. Keeping these two realities in mind, Tomoko Kiyota discussed the future of India-Japan security cooperation. Read more...


Hiroaki Kuwajima and Dr. Satu Limaye discuss the future of "Abenomics" in light of recent developments in Japan.November 19 Event: Abenomics: Time to Rethink the Three Arrows? 

 “Abenomics” is now facing a strong headwind because of unexpected economic trends –rising deflationary pressure, sluggish export growth and stagnating real wage increases, especially after the consumption tax increase implemented in April 2014.

With the deadline of deciding whether or not to implement a second consumption tax increase in December 2014 fast approaching, “Abenomics” is facing s critical challenges including the selection of one set of controversial economic policies over another. In this seminar, Mr. Hiroaki Kuwajima discussed the current domestic political debate regarding the set of upcoming economic policy choices and the broader political/economic implications of the policy decisions expected to be finalized this December. Read more...


 

Left to right: Walter Lohman, Dr. William Wilson, John Goyer and Dr. Peter PetriNovember 18 Event: Liberalization and Integration: Southeast Asia’s Economic Prospects 

During a joint event co-hosted with The Heritage Foundation, Dr. Peter Petri, John Goyer and Dr. William Wilson discussed their observations of ASEAN’s future following the recently concluded APEC meeting in November. Read more...

 

 


Mr. Sarang Shidore (left) and Dr. Satu Limaye (right) debate the trajectory of India's strategic culture.

 November 5 Event: The Evolution of India's Strategic Culture and U.S.-India Ties 

Sarang Shidore discussed the key paradigms of Indian strategic culture and their impact on India's relationship with the United States, particularly since the end of the Cold War. Mr. Shidore also addressed whether the recent election of a new Indian government is a symptom of deeper shifts in Indian strategic culture, and what may lie ahead for the U.S.-India relationship in the wake of Prime Minister Modi's recent visit to Washington.Read more...


Ambassador Robert Orr and Dr. Satu Limaye candidly discuss the status of the Asian Development Bank.November 4 Event:  The Asian Development Bank: A Progress Report

In an off-the record seminar, Ambassador Robert Orr spoke candidly on the current status of the Asian Development Bank and where he saw its trajectory going into the future Read more...

 

 


Ms. Ender Ricart and Dr. Albert Terrillion discuss the differences between US and Japanese approaches to caring for the elderly.October 22 Event: Caring for an Aging Population: U.S.-Japan Comparative Research into the Potential of a Prevention-Based Approach 

The challenges of an aging population in Japan have been in the headlines for years; by 2050, over 38% of Japan’s population will be over the age of 65. The US faces similar challenges; by 2050, 21% of the US population will be over the age of 65. Recent efforts to design a national long-term care (LTC) insurance system in the US have encountered the same problem with which Japan is trying to cope: How to finance and deliver the necessary services and benefits to cope with this change? Ender Ricart discussed the possible benefits of adopting and adapting Japan’s prevention-based approach to intervening in age-related illnesses and disease. This would help cut initial and overall healthcare costs and improve quality of life in old age. Ms. Ricart also discussed the cultural differences in conceptions of aging and old age and how this influences and is influenced by old-age healthcare policy in Japan and the U.S.  Read more...


Dr. Bates Gill and Dr. Satu Limaye comment on questions posed by the audience during the Alliance 21 report discussion event at the East-West Center in Washington.October 17 Event: Alliance 21: The Australia-United States Partnership

In a special briefing on the recently released report Alliance 21: The Australia-United States Partnership, which highlighted the broad array of mutual interests that underpin and sustain the remarkable Australia–US relationship now and in the future, Dr. Bates Gill, CEO of the United States Studies Centre, presented this report and discussed its findings at the East-West Center in Washington. Read more...


RADM Yuki Sekiguchi discusses Japan's strategic culture from the perspective of his own experiences in Japan's Self Defense Force.October 16 Event: Strategic Cultures Workshop: Asian Responses to Perceptions of Asia-Pacific Strategic Cultures

In a special workshop on the August 2014 edition of the journal Contemporary Security Policy special issue on the “Strategic Cultures and Security Policies of the Asia-Pacific,” authors and discussants debated strategic cultures in the Asia-Pacific region.  Read more...

 


From left to right the panelists are Mr. Pan Tao, Founder, Institute for Sustainable Environment and Energy (ISEE); Shanghai, China; Mr. Prodyut Bora, National Executive Member, Bharatiya Janata Party; Delhi, India; Mr. Abhishek Shah, Constituent Assembly Member, Legislative Parliament, Madheshi People’s Rights Forum; Patan, Kathmandu, Nepal; and Mr. Mark Stege, Council Member, Maloelap Atoll Council; Marshall Islands.  October 2 Event: Climate Change Realities: Perspectives from the Asia Pacific

In a special panel discussion, participants in the East-West Center’s New Generation Seminar Program, shared the realities of climate change in the Asia Pacific. These young leaders discussed the politics and public perception of the issue in their home countries, as well as the challenges of addressing a changing climate given competing priorities and budget constraints. They also shared regional perspectives on US leadership on climate change. Read more...


Dr. Mary McCarthy (left) and Dr. Daqing Yang (right) discuss how the issue of comfort women has been viewed in America.September 25 Event: Giving Voice: The “Comfort Women” Issue as an American Issue

Despite the passage of almost seven decades since the end of World War II, the issue of sexual slavery and the Imperial Japanese armed forces remains not only unresolved, but of increasing concern in East Asia and the United States.

In this seminar, Dr. Mary M. McCarthy analyzed how and why this subject resonates with people in the US today across ethnic and generational lines.  Read more...


Dr. Dieter Ernst describes the different paths that India and China have taken since joining the ITA.September 22 Event: Trade and Innovation: India’s and China’s Diverse Experiences with the Information Technology Agreement

In his talk, Dr. Dieter Ernst compared the diverse experiences of India and China with the Information Technology Agreement (ITA). He addressed two questions: Why has China’s electronics industry benefited substantially from the ITA, while in India, gains from trade liberalization were overshadowed by major costs that are eroding domestic electronic manufacturing and innovation? And to what degree are domestic economic structures and global network integration useful to explain these different experiences, and the very different approaches to the current impasse in negotiations to expand the product coverage of ITA? Read more...


Dr. Yasuhiro Matsuda (left) and Dr. Ellen Frost (right) weigh the scenarios of a possible meeting between Presidents Abe and Xi at the upcoming APEC Summit.September 17 Event: Amelioration of the Sino-Japanese Relations at the APEC Summit?: Driving Forces, Opportunities, and Risks of an Abe-Xi Meeting

It is likely that Prime Minister of Japan, Shinzo Abe, and Chinese President, Xi Jinping, will meet when the region’s leaders gather in Beijing for the APEC Summit in November. The governments of both Japan and China have been seeking amelioration of bilateral relations after the serious diplomatic and military row over the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands. However, similar attempts in the past nineteen months have failed. Will the meeting really happen? What will the preconditions be? What is the risk of the meeting? What are driving forces for the improvement relations? What is the future direction of the Sino-Japanese relations? Dr. Yasuhiro Matsuda attempted to offer some answers to this string of questions surrounding the most important and controversial bilateral relationship in East Asia.Read more...


Mendee Jargalsaikhan (left) and Dr. Satu Limaye (right) discuss the future of US-Mongolia relations.August 20 Event: Beyond the Quagmire: The Future of Mongolia’s United States and Japan Partnerships

In his presentation, Mendee Jargalsaikhan discussed the evolution of the Mongolia’s soft-balancing strategy with these two distant Great Powers, and present some possible policy options for enhancing collaboration among these like-minded democracies in the changing geopolitical landscape of Northeast Asia.Read more...


Dr. Dinshaw Mistry (left), Dr. Stephen Cohen (center) and Dr. Satu Limaye (right) debate areas of convergence in the US-India relationship.July 29 Event: Great Expectations? Assessing US-India Strategic Relations

American enthusiasm for a strategic partnership with India has risen and fallen over the years. Optimism about US-India relations in the 2000s has been tempered by pessimism about these ties in the 2010s. Was the initial enthusiasm about US-India relations inflated? How valid are more recent skeptical perspectives? In his presentation, Dr. Dinshaw Mistry discussed these questions, drawing upon ten contemporary cases where New Delhi’s policies converged with or diverged from Washington’s expectations.Read more...


Analyst, Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI), Canberra, Ms.Hayley Channer was visiting scholar at the East-West Center in Washington. While in the US, Channer researched the what the US expected of its allies as part of its new rebalance policy to Asia.June 3 Event: What the Hub Expects of the Spokes: How Japan, South Korea and Australia can Support the Rebalance to Asia

The Obama Administration’s ‘rebalance’ to Asia marked a major shift in US foreign policy as American forces drew down from the Middle East and Washington turned its attention to the Asia-Pacific. Until now, analysis of the rebalance has focused on what the US should be doing to support its allies during a period of shifting power dynamics and heightened regional tensions. Much less has been said about how US partners can support the rebalance. Ms. Hayley Channer interviewed government officials and experts to gain insight into what support America’s allies in Asia can provide. Read more...


Dr. James Manicom (left), Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt (center) and Dr. Satu Limaye (right) discussed Dr. Manicom's new book entitled Bridging Troubled Waters: China, Japan and Maritime Order in the East China Sea. May 13 Event: Bridging Troubled Waters: China, Japan, and Maritime Order in the East China Sea

In his new book Bridging Troubled Waters: China, Japan, and Maritime Order in the East China Sea, Dr. James Manicom reminds us that the tensions over the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands are only a part of a long history of both conflict and cooperation in maritime relations between Japan and China. He examines the cooperative history between China and Japan at sea and explains the conditions under which two rivals can manage territorial and maritime disputes.Read more...


Dr. Kent Calder (left) and Dr. Satu Limaye (right) discussed Dr. Calder's new book entitled Asia in Washington: Exploring the Penumbra of Transnational Power.April 23 Event: Asia in Washington: How Washington is Changing and How Asian Nations Respond

In his latest book, Asia in Washington: Exploring the Penumbra of Transnational Power (Brookings, 2014), Dr. Kent E. Calder explored the changing profile of the world’s premier political city in an increasingly global age, and how the key nations of Asia work to influence it. Drawing on his experience as an Asia specialist with over twenty years of Washington think tank, diplomatic, and Congressional as well as academic experience, Calder’s book considers in detail the public diplomacy and private lobbying efforts of China, Japan, South Korea, India, Myanmar, Indonesia and Singapore in the U.S. national capital.Read more...


Dr. Peter Petri (left) and Dr. Michael Plummer (right) co-authored a publication in the East West Center Policy Studies series entitled ASEAN Centrality and the ASEAN-US Economic Relationship.April 10 Event: ASEAN Centrality and the ASEAN-US Economic Relationship

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is strategically significant because of its size, dynamism, and role in the Asian economic and security architectures. How ASEAN seeks to strengthen these assets through "centrality" in intraregional and external policy decisions is examined in depth by Dr. Peter Petri and Dr. Michael Plummer in the latest issue of the East-West Center Policy Studies series. In a special launch program at the East-West Center in Washington, both authors discussed their research and recommendations on how ASEAN can use this approach to benefit all member economies. Read more...


Congressman Ed Royce, Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, giving remarks at the event.April 9 Event: Special Event: ASEAN Matters For America

The latest edition of the ASEAN Matters for America/America Matters for ASEAN publication was launched on April 9th with an event on Capitol Hill in Washington. Produced jointly by the East-West Center in Washington, the US-ASEAN Business Council and the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, ASEAN Matters highlights all aspects of the US-ASEAN relationship, including analysis of trade and investment levels, mutual travel and tourism rates, student exchanges, and security alliances, among other things. The publication highlights state- and congressional district-level facts and figures to illustrate the importance of the relationship on a local level. Read more...


Pictured here left to right: Mr. Khalid Khan Kheshgi, Mr. Riaz Burki, Mr. Jeeyand Kashif Sajidi, and Dr. Marvin Weinbaum (Discussant).April 7 Event: Pakistani Journalists' Perspectives on Post-US Afghanistan: Implications for Pakistan

When the United States draws down its presence after over a decade in Afghanistan, the effects will not stop at the border. In a special panel discussion on their visit to the US, participants in the East-West Center’s United States-Pakistan Journalist Exchange Program shared their insights on how neighboring Pakistan will be affected by this change. Issues discussed included the status of Afghan refugees in Pakistan, the impact on the border regions of FATA and Balochistan, and Pakistan government’s relationship with Afghanistan. Read more...


Dr. Daya Thussu discusses his book, Communicating India’s Soft Power: Buddha to Bollywood, at the East-West Center in WashingtonApril 3 Event: Communicating India’s Soft Power: Buddha to Bollywood

The notion of Soft Power, associated with the work of Joseph Nye, is defined, simply, as “the ability to attract people to our side without coercion.” Though Nye’s focus remains primarily on the United States, the concept has been adopted or adapted by countries around the world as an increasingly visible component of foreign policy strategy. Focusing on the Indian case, Dr. Daya Thussu reviewed the contribution that an old civilization like India can have on the discourse of soft power. In his talk at the East-West Center on his new book, Communicating India’s Soft Power: Buddha to Bollywood, he examined how the country has made itself attractive, drawing on its democratic, demographic and diasporic resources. Read more...


In his talk at the East-West Center, Dr. Tsutomu Kikuchi shared his expertise on Japan's engagement with ASEAN, and why it has taken on greater priority in Tokyo policy circles.March 20 Event: Japan is Back: Tokyo’s Reengagement with Southeast Asia

Since the 1970s, Japan has established close and cooperative relations with the ASEAN countries in both economic and political areas. Encouraged by recent grave economic and strategic transformations of Asia, Japan is “re-discovering” the importance of Southeast Asia in its economic and security policies. This was clearly demonstrated by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visits to all the capitals of the ASEAN member countries within one year since his return to office in late 2012. Dr. Tsutomu Kikuchi addressed the background of Japan’s current policy and explained the challenges and tasks facing Japan in its approach to Southeast Asia. Read more...


East-West Center in Washington Director, Dr. Satu Limaye (right), and Dr. Madoka Fukuda, listen as their colleagues take a question from the floor. Dr. Fukuda and Mr Chihiro Okawa (not pictured) presented their respective research as part of the inaugural year of the "Young Japanese Scholars/Experts Overseas Deployment Program."March 10 Event: Young Japanese Scholars Program: New Views on Politics and Policy from Tokyo to Taiwan

Open communication and the exchange of ideas is a key component of both US-Japan relationship and the Young Japanese Scholars/Experts Overseas Deployment Program. Project advisor Dr. Toshihiro Nakayama, professor at Aoyama Gakuin University, described the "thrust of this program" as to provide new Japanese scholars the skills they need to participate and share ideas in global forums. Two participants in this SPF-sponsored initiative, which is also designed to provide opportunities for international dialogue to a new generation, presented their research on contemporary Japanese policy... Read more...


Dr. Stephen Blank (left) explained how a convergence of mutual needs and shared risks have spurred bilateral efforts for a Russo-Japan rapprochement as discussant Hirohisa Mori looks on.March 7 Event: Beyond the Kuriles: New Trends in Russo-Japanese Relations

Russo-Japanese relations are undergoing a fresh rejuvenation. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to Sochi underscores his determination to end what he calls the "abnormal" situation, wherein Japan and Russia still have no peace treaty 69 years after the end of World War II. Beyond this fact and the associated territorial issues connected with the Kurile Islands seized by Moscow in 1945, both sides have ample economic and security reasons for getting together. In this presentation at the East-West Center in Washington, Dr. Stephen Blank outlined the latest developments in Russo-Japanese relations in both the economic and security spheres... Read more...


In his talk at the East-West Center in Washington, Dr. Nobuhiro Aizawa, a researcher at the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO), sought to explain Japan's expanding strategic interest in Southeast Asia, beyond its historical development activities.March 5 Event: Japan's Evolving Relationship with Southeast Asia: Prospects for US-Japan Cooperation

While renewed and expanded engagement with Southeast Asia is a core element of the United States’ rebalance towards Asia, it is not alone in pursuing a strategy of reengagement with this dynamic region. Japan has long been involved in Southeast Asia, with a decades-long track record of overseas development assistance (ODA) and trade and investment. Recently however, Tokyo has taken steps to cultivate and strengthen strategic ties with the region as well. In his talk at the East-West Center in Washington, Dr. Nobuhiro Aizawa explained Japan's evolving relations with Southeast Asia, particularly from the strategic perspective. Read more...


Director of South Asia Programs and Kraemer Strategy Fellow at the American Foreign Policy Council, Jeff M. Smith, explained the complex relationship between India and China in his book talk at the East-West Center in Washington.February 20 Event: Cold Peace: China-India Rivalry in the 21st Century

Mr. Jeff M. Smith launched his latest book, Cold Peace: China–India Rivalry in the Twenty-First Century (Lexington Books, 2014) at the East-West Center in Washington. Through rare and unique field research from the disputed China–India border in the Himalayas to the Andaman and Nicobar Islands; and over 100 interviews with experts, government officials, and military officers in India, China, and the United States, the book seeks to unravel the complex layers of the contemporary China–India rivalry. In his talk, Smith shared some of his insights into what is fast becoming one of the most important relationships in Asia and the world at large. Read more...


Dr. Yoichiro Sato shared the perspective of 'an average Japanese citizen' on the Yasukuni Shrine controversies at the East-West Center in WashingtonFebruary 7 Event: The Yasukuni Puzzle: Why the United States Should Not Buy into the Narrative of Japan's Rightward Drift

Japanese Prime Minister Abe Shinzo's late December visit to the Yasukuni Shrine invited criticism from China, Korea, and the United States. The shrine, long considered a resting place for Japan’s war dead, became controversial after Class A war criminals were included among the interred in the post-war years. Therefore visits by Japanese government officials raise fears among some in the region of a tacit official reverence for Japan’s militant past. Hoping to share the perspective of the average Japanese citizen, Dr. Yoichiro Sato argued that attributing Abe's visit to an ultranationalist foreign policy with broad public support is a gross misinterpretation... Read more...


Dr. Christopher Yung explained the methodology and some of the analysis that has come from his year-long project to create a database of the actions taken by countries to assert their claims in the South China Sea.January 28 Event: Claimant Tactics in the South China Sea

For the past year the Institute for National Strategic Studies (INSS) at the National Defense University has been involved in a study to comprehensively collect the actions and tactics being undertaken by the countries with territorial claims in the South China Sea. In this year-long study, Dr. Christopher Yung, and Patrick McNulty, a research assistant at INSS, collected all open press reports of these activities involving China, Vietnam, the Philippines, Taiwan, Malaysia, and Brunei in the South China Sea, creating a comprehensive database. From this data, various patterns are analyzed and conclusions reached; including which tactics are most often utilized by the claimant countries, which country uses the greatest number of methods and total number of actions to advance its claims, and which countries resort the most (and the least) to the use of military and paramilitary actions... Read more...


Dr. John Ciociari explained history and complicated structure of the Khmer Rouge tribunal in Cambodia to an audience at the East-West Center in Washington.January 16 Event: Hybrid Justice: Trials and Errors at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

In 2006, a UN-backed tribunal opened its doors to try key Khmer Rouge officials for atrocities of the late 1970s. This unique “hybrid” tribunal fuses Cambodian and international laws, procedure, and personnel in an effort to deliver justice for some of modern history’s most egregious crimes. As Dr. John Ciorciari argues, operating the hybrid court effectively has proven very difficult, and despite some successes, the tribunal’s legacy is in peril... Read more...


Japan Studies Visiting Fellow, Sean Connell, offered his views on how new Japanese economic initiatives can effect US-Japan economic ties, ongoing bilateral initiatives on innovation, and potential areas for new cooperationJanuary 9 Event: Innovation and Growth in US-Japan Economic Relations: Areas for New Engagement?

Innovation is a key characteristic and comparative advantage of the US and Japanese economies, and it is widely recognized by policy makers, business leaders, and the broader public in both countries as essential for future growth and competitiveness. The two governments increasingly recognize innovation as an area with good potential for expanding bilateral cooperation, and in recent years this topic has risen to the fore within several joint initiatives and policy dialogs. With Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s economic revitalization initiatives and Japan’s participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations bringing new momentum to US-Japan economic ties, increased focus on innovation offers a potentially valuable framework for identifying new opportunities to collaborate in advancing shared goals... Read more...