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The East-West Center Research Program works with research and policy communities in the US and the Asia Pacific to provide more complete knowledge and deeper understanding of environments, societies, economies, governments, and international relations in the region. Research is conducted in close collaboration with networks of individuals and institutions throughout Asia and the Pacific and is shared broadly with planners, policymakers, regional specialists, the media, and the general public.

Integrating Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Management to Protect Health and Build Resilience in Pacific Islands

Climate change is affecting the Pacific Islands and their populations through rising temperatures, changing rainfall, sea level rise, and a growing number of extreme weather and climate events. Health leaders and climate-change experts came together at a workshop cohosted by the East-West Center and the Aspen Global Change Institute to promote the integration of climate change adaptation with disaster risk management.

 

 

Other Recent Activities

Based on interviews with anti-trafficking practitioners in four Southeast Asian nations, Getting to Good Human Trafficking Data: Everyday Guidelines for Frontline Practitioners in Southeast Asia offers standards and recommendations based on current understanding of good, responsible data practices.

 

 

 

 

East-West Wires are two-page summaries of findings and commentary from East-West Center researchers and colleagues, covering a wide range of topics. Many recent Wires are based on presentations made in the Research Program's Noon Seminar Series.

 

 

 

 

The Arctic in World Affairs: A North Pacific Dialogue on Building Capacity for a Sustainable Arctic in a Changing Global Order addresses: the impacts of a changing global order; responsible economic development; sustainable communities; challenges and opportunities for global maritime industries; and enhanced dialogue between practitioners and analysts.

 

 

 

 

Japan's dramatic transformation from economic success story to prime example of economic stagnation offers important policy lessons to advanced countries everywhere. Economic Stagnation in Japan, Exploring the Causes and Remedies of Japanization assesses a wide range of policy approaches aimed at avoiding stagnation and economic decline.

 

 

 

 

Current Research Projects…

 

Recent Publications by East-West Center Authors

Brunner, Jessie (2018). Getting to good human trafficking data: Everyday guidelines for frontline practitioners in Southeast Asia. Stanford, California: WS Handa Center for Human Rights and International Justice; Honolulu, Hawaii: East-West Center; West Java, Indonesia: Human Rights Resource Centre.

The guidelines are based on interviews with anti-trafficking practitioners in four Southeast Asian nations, with additional input from international experts on human trafficking and data management. They offer baseline standards and recommendations based on current understanding of good, responsible data practices.

Cho, Dongchui, Takatoshi Ito, and Andrew Mason, eds. (2018). Economic stagnation in Japan: Exploring the causes and remedies of Japanization. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar.

Japan's dramatic transformation from economic success story to prime example of economic stagnation offers important policy lessons to advanced countries everywhere. This book assesses a wide range of policy approaches aimed at avoiding stagnation and economic decline.

Ernst, Dieter, and Michael G. Plummer, eds. (2018). Megaregionalism 2.0: Trade and innovation within global networks. World Scientific.

International trade and investment play critical role in fostering sustainable growth and prosperity. Economic policies are needed to ensure that gains and losses from trade are shared by all.

Ha, Joonkyung, and Sang-Hyop Lee (2018). Population aging and the possibility of a middle-income trap in Asia. ADB Economics Working Paper. Manila: Asian Development Bank.

Low fertility in many Asian countries could slow down economic growth and lead to a middle-income trap.

Harwit, Eric (2018). Is 5G wireless technology the next field for Chinese dominance? China-US Focus, 4 April.

If Chinese companies succeed in designing and deploying key technologies for 5G systems, they may reap a whirlwind of profits from a multitude of new technologies and gain unparalleled leverage in areas far beyond their national borders. 

National Transfer Accounts (2018). What do we learn when we "Count Women's Work"?  NTA Bulletin No.11. Honolulu: East-West Center.

Taking account of unpaid care and housework substantially increases the cost of raising children but also shows that the elderly are not as heavy a burden on their families as sometimes suggested.

Roy, Denny (2018). How America can meet China's challenge, by Denny Roy. 2018. The National Interest. 25 April 2018.

Even small steps by the U.S. government that appear to signal an upgrade in relations with Taipei cause great consternation in Beijing. A second weak spot of the Chinese Communist Party is the exposure of the corruption or incompetence of senior officials.

Saksena, Sumeet, Chinh Cong Tran, and Jefferson Fox (2018). Household cooking fuel use in rural and peri-urban Viet Nam: A multilevel longitudinal analysis of supply side factors, by Energy for Sustainable Development. 44:47–54.

In some places in Vietnam the transition from wood to cleaner fuels for household cooking has slowed down due to the government's successful small-holder tree-planting programs. Highway construction and improved access to markets may facilitate households moving to cleaner fuels.

Woods, Kevin (2018). Rubber out of the ashes: Locating Chinese agribusiness investments in "armed sovereignties" in the Myanmar-Chinese borderlands. Territory, Politics, Governance. Forthcoming special issue: Grounding China’s Global Integration. DOI: 10.1080/21622671.2018.1460276.

The borderland between Myanmar and China has been splintered for decades by fighting among local militias. To assert control, the Myanmar government allocated large tracts of land to private businesses to grow rubber and other crops. This “land grab” has been financed in part by the Chinese government under the guise of a crop-substitution program to reduce the production of heroin.

More Publications by East-West Center Authors

* Publications on Environmental Issues

* Publications on Population and Health

* Publications on Innovation, Economic Integration, and Growth

* Publications on Governance, Security, and Justice

 

EWC Research in the News

8 July 2018—RIMPAC 2018: US Navy tests its limits after series of accidents, CGTN America: Denny Roy

Two deadly collisions in 2017 revealed that the U.S. Pacific forces are stretched to the limit, but Denny Roy comments that the Navy's planned expansion to 355 ships probably "won't happen until the 2050s."

28 June 2018—How climate change is threatening the Navy's footprint in the Pacific, USA Today: Victoria Keener

The island of Guam, home to two of the US's most strategically important military bases, is threatened by declining rainfall associated with climate change. If water mismanagement practices are not quickly corrected, Victoria Keener explains, overuse will spell disaster for Guam’s supply of freshwater.

27 June 2018—Will Asia grow old before it becomes rich?, Asian Development Blog: Sang-Hyop Lee

In several countries of East and Southeast Asia, very low fertility, combined with increasing longevity, is leading to large proportions of elderly in national populations. This demographic shift can potentially slow economic growth, leaving these countries in a "middle-income trap."

19 June 2018—Is China winning the innovation race?, leapsmag: Dieter Ernst

“There’s a growing consensus that China is poised to overtake us,” says Dieter Ernst, “and that we need to design policies to obstruct its rise.” Ernst argues, however, that such measures are motivated largely by exaggerated notions of China’s ability to reach its ambitious goals and by the political advantages of fearmongering.

16 May 2018—Why North Korea's Kim Jong Un is in peace mode, Honolulu Star Advertiser: Denny Roy

Even if Kim Jong Un’s offer to denuclearize is sincere, the process will require many gradual steps and years of tough negotiations, and Kim can be expected to demand concessions at every step.

1 May 2018—Some US defenses against a North Korean nuclear attack could be knocked out without a shot, Business Insider: Victoria Keener

Victoria Keener told Business Insider that climate change poses direct threats to US security from increasing impacts of sea-level rise, waves, and intense storms on coastal military infrastructure and indirect threats from salinized soil and groundwater, effects on human health, and migration induced by climate impacts and instability.

More East-West Center in the News…

 

* Research Projects

* Upcoming Events

* Research Staff